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Star Trek Predicting the Future Since 1966

Star Trek Predicting the Future Since 1966

Star Trek Predicting the Future Since 1966

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From the original 1966 Star Trek déjà vu a reality, to the creative scifi idea of a television show about a decades-long drought in California, the Trekkies dream of describing our futures.

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Perhaps the biggest contributors to the pantheon of science fiction predicting the future is the Star Trek franchise, responsible for innumerate soothsaying moments. The writers of the Star Trek films and TV shows have long pitched futuristic inventions and technologies, which have subsequently become reality.

According to this meme below it seems that Star Trek has been predicting the future since the first series started. First the cell phone was predicted in 1966 (it was officially invented in 1973), then the iPad in 1987 (it was officially unveiled in 2010), then video conferencing in 1988 (it was officially available by 2008) and Google Glass in 1998 (it was unveiled earlier in 2013). I think this is hilariously accurate – excuse the pun. (Source: rwrant.co.za)

Trek

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On Star Trek: The Next Generation, you could walk into a chamber on the Enterprise and visit your home planet for a quick barbecue, or even have an affair with a hologram. Leave it to a bunch of University of Southern California students to make virtual reality a little more down-to-Earth—Project Holodeck used virtual reality goggles to create a fictional world. (Though no encounters with Minuet were reported.)

In the world of Star Trek, there's no need for needles (and thus no trypanophobia)—Bones administered medicine through the skin using painless jet-injected hypospray. Recently, MIT created a similar device that, according to Geek.com, "delivers a drug through the skin at speeds of up to 340 meters per second and in under a millisecond. The amount of drug can be varied, as can how deep it is injected. And as far as the patient is concerned, they shouldn’t feel anything other than the tip of the injector against their skin. That’s because the jet is as thin as a mosquito’s proboscis." It's not the first, but it does have more control than other hyposprays, which means it could actually be a replacement for needles—and that would make visits to the doctor's office with your kids much easier. (Source: www.mentalfloss.com)

 

 

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