FutureStarr

Silene Plant

Silene Plant

Silene Plant

The similar tall (S. altissima) and Canada (S. canadensis) goldenrods are ubiquitous, rather weedy species, more common on drier ground, although they will be found on slightly wet ground also. Stems of these species are rough or hairy. We do not stock these, however they are almost certain to show up in your prairie! Late Goldenrod is rhizomatous and aggressive and therefore may not be suitable for small landscape plantings.

Plant

Whatever your preference or situation may be, there is a goldenrod to suit all occasions. Sadly, goldenrods often get blamed for causing the dreaded hayfever. This is simply not true. Their pollen is quite large and sticky so as to better adhere to the body of visiting insects. Because of this, goldenrod pollen cannot become airborne and can never make its way into your sinuses. The true cause of hayfever is the wind pollinated ragweeds, which broadcast copious amounts of lightweight pollen into the air. We cannot stress enough how important goldenrods are on the landscape. Including them on your property will provide ecosystem services well into the fall when most other plant life is shutting down. The third species in this complex, Giant Goldenrod (S. gigantea), has stems hairless below the flower clusters that often have a waxy coating, its leaves are toothy and hairless except sometimes on the veins, and it also frequently has galls on the lower stem, but they'll be hairless on the surface where galls on Tall Goldenrod will be hairy. Contrary to popular belief, Tall goldenrod appears to be the predominant species throughout the greater Metro area, typically tolerating drier sites than Canada or Giant Goldenrod and it—not Canada Goldenrod—is usually the species you'll see completely filling up old fields or open disturbed areas.

goldenrod, any of about 150 species of weedy, usually perennial herbs that constitute the genus Solidago of the family Asteraceae. Most of them are native to North America, though a few species grow in Europe and Asia. They have toothed leaves that usually alternate along the stem and yellow flower heads composed of both disk and ray flowers. The many small heads may be crowded together in one-sided clusters, or groups of heads may be borne on short branches to form a cluster at the top of the stem.Both Canadian and Early Goldenrod Solidago gigantea grow wild in Scandanavia. Garden escapes were noted as early as 1910. Although it’s an invasive, and can be a nuisance, Goldenrod does bring benefits. It’s extremely good for pollinators, and attracts lots of butterflies. As it flowers late in the year, it provides a welcome food supply for insects about to overwinter. (To make your garden wildlife friendly, check out the Save the Bees guest blog.) (Source: lizzieharper.co.uk)

 

 

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