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Seeds have sprouted now what

Seeds have sprouted now what

Seeds have sprouted now what

Once the seeds have sprouted you should remove the cover and leave the set for a few hours a day. In about a week, your plants should have several leaves, buds will be showing, and the shoots will be about the same length as your finger.This is also the time to start fertilizing. Use a water soluble fertilizer such as a 10-52-10. Add fertilizer to tepid water, as directed, and fertilize about every third watering. A high middle number (phosphorous) will encourage a good root system; a high first number (nitrogen) will encourage too much leaf growth and the third number (potassium) will allow for better uptake of food and water from the soil and is good for the over-all health of the plant. At this point, don’t over-fertilize and don’t over-water.

Leaf

via GIPHY

Once the seedlings appear to be over-crowded, or have developed their second set of leaves, it is time to separate them and transplant them into little containers of their own, (about 1 ½” – 2”) large. Pick the plants up by the leaves, not the stem or roots when you are transplanting. Make sure the containers you are using have holes for good drainage. Peat pots are excellent ones to use as they allow the water to pass through and you won’t have to remove your plant when planting out into the soil as the peat pot will break down in the moist soil. If you transplant seedlings into a container that is too large, you won’t see much new top-growth, however, the plant will be busy growing roots to fill the container. At this point, you may want to switch to an all-purpose fertilizer (20-20-20). I like using a very weak strength of fertilizer with every watering.

Always harden off your plants before planting them outside by gradually getting them used to the conditions in which they are going to grow. A plant that has been pampered with a lot of water, fertilizer heat and humidity will grow lush, green, tender foliage but will be the first to go into shock and keel over in our Manitoba sun and wind. Always put your tender plants into a shady, sheltered spot for the first couple of days and then gradually introduce them out into the wind and sun. If your plants become withered or start showing signs of too much sun (white leaves), give them a good watering and put them back into the sheltered shade. Your plants will soon become used to the conditions and be less likely to succumb to the harsh conditions of the outside. A good rule to follow when planting is to plant your sun plants out first and then your shade plants. Usually the shade plants are more tender and planting out too early (impatiens or begonia) will set them back or you may lose them if the nights dip down to below 10 degrees. (Source: www.jensennursery.com)

 

 

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