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Salvia Plants

Salvia Plants

Salvia Plants

The Salvia genus fits into the mint (Lamiaceae) family of plants, and, predictably, many of these species have a strong, pleasant scent, making them attractive to bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. While most salvia species are technically perennials, some of the most popular are more often planted as annuals in colder regions. The majority of salvia plants are known for their long bloom period, which sometimes can extend from late spring all the way into fall. If nothing else, these plants are guaranteed to inject dependable color into your garden design. A familiar plant, scarlet sage, also known simply as red salvia, is technically a tropical perennial, but it's more commonly grown as an annual. The species has bright scarlet flowers, but there are also cultivars that offer white, salmon, pink, lavender, burgundy, and orange blossoms. These workhorses bloom from June all the way to frost. Scarlet sage is used so often that many people consider it dull, but, if you need to inject a splash of red into a sunny landscape, few plants outperform this one. Diviner's sage, known among its enthusiasts simply as "salvia," is rarely grown as an ornamental. While it has attractive purple flowers, the plants don't bloom readily, and the stalks are prone to breaking. But this salvia is nonetheless very popular among certain individuals, thanks to a substance contained in the leaves that produces hallucinations. The plant has a long history of use by shamans of the Mazatec tribes of southern Mexico, who used the leaves to produce a potion used in divination ceremonies.Bentham's work on classifying the family Labiatae (Labiatarum Genera et Species (1836)) is still the only comprehensive and global organization of the family

. While he was clear about the integrity of the overall family, he was less confident about his organization of Salvia, the largest genus in Labiatae (also called Lamiaceae). Based on his own philosophy of classification, he wrote that he "ought to have formed five or six genera" out of Salvia. In the end, he felt that the advantage in placing a relatively uniform grouping in one genus was "more than counterbalanced by the necessity of changing more than two hundred names." At that time there were only 291 known Salvia species.To make Salvia monophyletic would require the inclusion of 15 species from Rosmarinus, Perovskia, Dorystaechas, Meriandra, and Zhumeria genera. The information attained by Walker and Sytsma (2007) supporting the three independent origins of the staminal lever indicate that Salvia is not the case where 15 species (currently not members of the genus) are actually members of Salvia but underwent character reversals—in other words, Salvia is paraphyletic as previously circumscribed. In 2017 Drew et al.Salvias (ornamental sage) are a must in the summer garden. They come in a vast range of forms and colours and their nectar-rich flowers are a magnet for bees, butterflies and other pollinating insects. They flower for months on end, often from midsummer until the first frosts, and many have aromatic foliage, too. The name ‘salvia’ derives from the Latin salveo, meaning ‘I heal’ or ‘I save’. The culinary herb, Salvia officinalis, was used as a healing plant by Greeks and Romans and is part of part of the huge Salvia genus. (Source: www.gardenersworld.com)

 

 

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