FutureStarr

Sage Flower Seeds

Sage Flower Seeds

Sage Flower Seeds

Prairie buildings are, as Wright said, “married to the ground.” They celebrate the long, low landscape of the Midwest. Their most defining characteristic is their emphasis on the horizontal rather than the vertical. They spread out over their lots, featuring flat or shallow hipped roof lines, rows of windows, overhanging eaves and bands of stone, wood or brick across the surface. Thin Roman bricks sometimes enhance the effect and cantilevers often extend the horizontal line without vertical support. Even the unwelcome verticals of downspouts are either eliminated or carefully placed.

Seeds

This digital collection integrates two collections from the holdings of the Nebraska State Historical Society, the Solomon D. Butcher photographs and the letters of the Uriah W. Oblinger family. Together they illustrate the story of settlement on the Great Plains. Approximately 3,000 glass plate negatives crafted by Butcher record the process of settlement in Nebraska between 1886 and 1912. Butcher photographed actively in central Nebraska including Custer, Buffalo, Dawson and Cherry counties. The approximately 3,000 pages of Oblinger family letters discuss land, work, neighbors, crops, religious meetings, problems with grasshoppers, financial problems, and the Easter Blizzard of 1873. Uriah Oblinger came from Indiana to Fillmore County, Nebraska in 1873 to claim a homestead for his family. In the eloquent letters exchanged between Uriah and his wife Mattie, and in letters to other family members, Oblinger expresses very personal insight into the joy, despair, and determination in their struggle to establish a home on the prairie.The style reached its fullest expression in residences, like Wright’s Robie House and George W. Maher’s Pleasant Home, but schools, warehouses and park buildings were also built in the style.

They spread out over their lots, featuring flat or shallow hipped roof lines, rows of windows, overhanging eaves and bands of stone, wood or brick across the surface. Thin Roman bricks sometimes enhance the effect and cantilevers often extend the horizontal line without vertical support. Even the unwelcome verticals of downspouts are either eliminated or carefully placed.The Prairie style emerged in Chicago around 1900 from the work of a group of young architects, including Frank Lloyd Wright. These architects melded the ideals of the Arts and Crafts movement, with its emphasis on nature, craftsmanship and simplicity, and the work and writings of architect Louis Sullivan. They embraced Sullivan’s architectural theories, which called for non-derivative, distinctly American architecture rooted in nature, with a sense of place, but also incorporated modern elements, like flat planes and stylized ornamentation.Prairie buildings are, as Wright said, “married to the ground.” They celebrate the long, low landscape of the Midwest. Their most defining characteristic is their emphasis on the horizontal rather than the vertical. They spread out over their lots, featuring flat or shallow hipped roof lines, rows of windows, overhanging eaves and bands of stone, wood or brick across the surface. Thin Roman bricks sometimes enhance the effect and cantilevers often extend the horizontal line without vertical support. Even the unwelcome verticals of downspouts are either eliminated or carefully placed. (Source: www.architecture.org)

 

 

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