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Problem Action Result Resume OR

Problem Action Result Resume OR

Problem Action Result Resume

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We know that you want to tell your own story in a memorable fashion. So how do you describe your professional experiences in a way that captures the attention of recruiters and hiring managers?

Problem

What kind of material is right for PARs? First, use specific examples of key accomplishments and other stories based on your elevator pitch and résumé bullets. Many behavioral questions target how you manage problems, stressful situations, changing or unanticipated environments (in essence, bad things), so be ready to deal with them. In general, think of relevant stories that show you in action—where you were effective, creative and resilient, rose to the occasion or saved the day.

PARs, as described in Part 1 of this post, are stories that describe Problems, Actions, and Results you’ve delivered for your employers. These concrete examples of how you solved problems at a prior job are compelling testimonials of your abilities. They make a memorable, positive impression on interviewers that can give you an edge in landing a job. (Source: www.ivyexec.com)

Action

—Opportunity: When I was promoted to product manager for the XYZ line, it was making money but wasn’t growing. It was considered mature—a “cash cow.” But I believed there was still growth potential, and set out to find it. Actions: First, I traveled to 10 different markets, five outside the U.S. (ever been to Singapore in August?); met with our regional sales managers, distributors and retailers. Wore out a pair of shoes walking the aisles of dozens of stores that sold our products, to get input directly from sales clerks and customers. I came back with a lot of information— why people like the XYZ products, how they use them, why they like our competitors’ products. Then I created a task force with people from R&D, strategy, and marketing; got them jazzed about the possibilities. After poring over the market intelligence and brainstorming for weeks, we selected 10 ideas to pursue. Eventually, we got funding to develop a new product model with extra bells and whistles that didn’t cost much to produce, but that customers wanted enough to pay a premium. Results: In our first year we sold $12 million of the enhanced product without cannibalizing legacy revenues. We now project that the XYZ line will grow 15% next year, with profit margins improving.

What kind of material is right for PARs? First, use specific examples of key accomplishments and other stories based on your elevator pitch and résumé bullets. Many behavioral questions target how you manage problems, stressful situations, changing or unanticipated environments (in essence, bad things), so be ready to deal with them. In general, think of relevant stories that show you in action—where you were effective, creative and resilient, rose to the occasion or saved the day. (Source: www.ivyexec.com)

 

 

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