FutureStarr

Prairie Wildflowers OOR

Prairie Wildflowers OOR

Prairie Wildflowers OOR

Monkeyflowers (genus Mimulus) are California natives that offer bright, profusely blooming color to a water-wise garden. The Latin word ‘mimus’ is derived from the Greek word ‘mimos’ that means “imitator”, referencing the blossoms that (with a bit of imagination) look like painted “mime” or monkey faces. Fast-growing, with a relatively long bloom time and host of environmental benefits, they have become widely popular with good reason.

Prairie

Mimulus can work well in many parts of a landscape and are proof that vibrant color and interest are not sacrificed when choosing sustainable, water-conserving plants. Use in mixed borders, containers, or even rock gardens. Combine with other spring and summer-blooming native plants like Ceanothus, or accent with succulents like aloe and agave for striking texture. Knowing how recently this was planted would help us diagnose, but generally mimulus plants are crawling plants. They will rise up to the sky and eventually fall over under their own weight and then continue to grow in a crawling manner. If your plant is relatively new, this is normal behavior. However, be honest about how you planted it. If you planted it in the dense clay-like soil commonly found around here without amending the soil first to make it looser and more drainable, that can be detrimental to the long-term health of your plant also. If your plant is well established, then drooping leaves can indicate either a watering issue or a nutrient deficiency. Visit us in-store for a more complete diagnosis and fertilizer recommendations.

In 1998, we conducted observations (>80 hr) in a sympatric area along the South Fork of the Tuolumne River, California, and found that bees were the only visitors to M. lewisii (100% of 233 visits), and that hummingbirds were the primary visitors to M. cardinalis (97% of 146 visits). Only once did we observe a pollinator visit both Mimulus species in succession. These results show that pollinator discrimination results in strong premating reproductive isolation in the zone of sympatry. s carrying the dominant M. lewisii allele are pink-flowered (Fig. 1 F–J). There was no effect of yup genotype on hummingbird visitation rate (Fig. 3A), but bee visitation was 80% lower in plants homozygous for the M. cardinalis allele (Fig. 3B). This clearly shows that genetic variation for petal carotenoid concentration affects bee visitation and supports earlier findings that bees visiting Mimulus species in the section Erythranthe strongly prefer pink over red flowers (26). (Source: www.pnas.org)

 

 

 

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