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Plan De Ayala Resumen OR

Plan De Ayala Resumen OR

Plan De Ayala Resumen

via GIPHY

el alcalde de ayala presento el proyecto de la plan de ayala

Plan

We who undersign, constituted in a revolutionary junta to sustain and carry out the promises which the revolution of November 20, 1910, just past, made to the country, declare solemnly before the face of the civilized world which judges us and before the nation to which we belong and which we call [sic, love], propositions which we have formulated to end the tyranny which oppresses us and redeem the fatherland from the dictatorships which are imposed on us, which [propositions] are determined in the following plan:

Madero was elected president in November 1911, and Zapata met with him again but without success. With the help of a teacher, Otilio Montaño, Zapata prepared the Plan of Ayala, which declared Madero incapable of fulfilling the goals of the revolution. The signers renewed the revolution and promised to appoint a provisional president until there could be elections. They also vowed to return the stolen land to the ejidos by expropriating, with payment, a third of the area of the haciendas; those haciendas that refused to accept this plan would have their lands expropriated without compensation. Zapata adopted the slogan “Tierra y Libertad” (“Land and Liberty”). (Source: www.britannica.com)

Revolution

Madero was elected president in November 1911, and Zapata met with him again but without success. With the help of a teacher, Otilio Montaño, Zapata prepared the Plan of Ayala, which declared Madero incapable of fulfilling the goals of the revolution. The signers renewed the revolution and promised to appoint a provisional president until there could be elections. They also vowed to return the stolen land to the ejidos by expropriating, with payment, a third of the area of the haciendas; those haciendas that refused to accept this plan would have their lands expropriated without compensation. Zapata adopted the slogan “Tierra y Libertad” (“Land and Liberty”).

Following the war, the state congress of Oaxaca gave him the hacienda of La Noria and backed him for president of Mexico. After Benito Juárez was reelected in 1871, Díaz launched the revolution of La Noria in protest over what he claimed was a fraudulent election and demanding that presidents only serve one term. After Juárez died in 1872, and Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada became president, Díaz began preparing for his next rebellion. In January 1876 Díaz revolted with his Plan of Tuxtepec, calling for no reelection and municipal freedom. This time his revolt succeeded and he became president on November 23,1876 and would stay in office until November 30, 1880. (Source: www.loc.gov)

 

 

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