FutureStarr

Ostrich fern in win

Ostrich fern in win

Ostrich fern in winter

Not touched by the harsh frosts at night or the milder, sometimes moist morning breezes, the dense foliage of Ostrich Fern holds needles, leaves and seeds close to the ground.Resembling long, feathery Ostrich plumes, Matteuccia struthiopteris (Ostrich Fern) is an elegant, upright to arching, deciduous fern with showy, finely dissected, fresh green sterile fronds. Emerging at the base of the plant in spring, they gracefully unfurl until they depreciate over the summer and lose their leaflets later in the fall, as the plant goes dormant for the winter. They surround shorter, brownish fertile fronds which will persist into winter. Low maintenance, pest and disease free, Ostrich Fern is a great asset for the bog garden!

Winter

via GIPHY

More textural than colorful, ostrich ferns develop impressively large fronds of bright green foliage. When they first emerge in spring, their iconic fiddleheads are probably some of the most photographed plants in the garden. A unique trait of ostrich ferns, like a few other fern families, is that these plants have separate fertile and infertile fronds. The sterile fronds are what most people initially think of: large, bright green leaves. They emerge in spring and are held right alongside the previous year's fertile fronds. Come fall, these leaves turn a bright golden color. While the sterile leaves can reach impressive sizes of 3 or 4 feet tall, the fertile leaves generally reach only about 2 feet tall. The fertile fronds develop later from the centers of the plants and are much smaller and deeper green. Eventually they develop clusters of spores on the backside of the fronds. Even throughout the winter months, the fertile fronds are held perfectly upright. Come spring, the fronds release their spores and eventually die back.

One of the most common native ferns, growing all over northern regions. Plants form a large, upright clump of big green fronds. In spring the unfurling fiddleheads are often harvested in the wild as a gourmet treat. Roots are spreading, and plants can form quite a large patch in time. Requires plenty of water through the summer, otherwise the foliage may become dormant. Cinnamon-brown fertile fronds push up from the centre of each clump in summer, and these remain attractive all winter long. Prune off dead foliage and fertile fronds in late winter. Deciduous.One of the most common native ferns, growing all over northern regions. Plants form a large, upright clump of big green fronds. In spring the unfurling fiddleheads are often harvested in the wild as a gourmet treat. Roots are spreading, and plants can form quite a large patch in time. Requires plenty of water through the summer, otherwise the foliage may become dormant. Cinnamon-brown fertile fronds push up from the centre of each clump in summer, and these remain attractive all winter long. Prune off dead foliage and fertile fronds in late winter. Deciduous. (Source: www.perennials.com)

 

 

Related Articles