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Ninebark Winter OOR

Ninebark Winter OOR

Ninebark Winter OOR

Description: The most reliable method of propagation is by seed. Plant seeds immediately after collection as they must not be allowed to dry out. Propagate by rhizome division in either fall or early spring. (Wear gloves and wash your hands after handling the roots.

Winter

bloodroot, (Sanguinaria canadensis), also called red puccoon, plant of the poppy family (Papaveraceae), native throughout eastern and midwestern North America. It grows in deciduous woodlands, where it blooms in early spring, and is sometimes cultivated as an ornamental. The orange-red sap of the rhizomes was formerly used by Native Americans for dye. The rhizomes also contain the medical alkaloidSanguinaria canadensis plants are found growing in moist to dry woods and thickets, often on floodplains and near shores or streams on slopes. They grow less frequently in clearings and meadows or on dunes, and are rarely found in disturbed sites. Deer feed on the plants in early spring.

Bloodroot is one of many plants whose seeds are spread by ants, a process called myrmecochory. The seeds have a fleshy organ called an elaiosome that attracts ants. The ants take the seeds to their nest, where they eat the elaiosomes, and put the seeds in their nest debris, where they are protected until they germinate. They also benefit from growing in a medium made richer by the ant nest debris.Sanguinaria canadensis is cultivated as an ornamental plant. The double-flowered forms are prized by gardeners for their large showy white flowers, which are produced very early in the gardening season. Bloodroot flower petals are shed within a day or two of pollination, so the flower display is short-lived, but the double forms bloom much longer than the normal forms. The double flowers are made up of stamens that have been changed into petal-like parts, making pollination more difficult. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

 

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