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Native Illinois Flowers

Native Illinois Flowers

Native Illinois Flowers

This white flowering plant produces blooms that look like upside-down breeches, hence its name. It thrives in shady areas, and since it’s native to Illinois, you’ll find it in wooded areas in just about every county in the state. Dutchman’s Breeches prefer moist areas, but they’re a hardy plant and can resist a moderate frost.Less well known is the fact that all violets do double duty. For example, Illinois residents interested in creating a Butterfly Garden will be happy to know that their violets provide food for the larvae of Variegated Fritillary Butterflies. Even better, the seven page Illinois Butterfly Garden publication provides excellent information on a variety of native plants that provide nectar for adults as well as a larval food source for most native butterfly speciesHappily, exceptions to the easy garden rule are limited. All Illinois gardeners can improve on their skills by starting with a great resource simply titled Designing a Flower Garden. It provides the basics of flower garden from soil analysis to flower selection. The tips work with all Illinois garden zones, which are stated as follows:The emergence of local plant nurseries and big box stores as anchors for a billion dollar horticulture industry speaks to the popularity of annual flowers for the garden. Another resource, Suggested Annual Flowers for Illinois confirms what many seasoned gardeners already know. Many native flowering plants and their hybrids grow almost effortlessly. Garden favorites from A to Z are covered. For example, when in doubt garden annuals such as geraniums and zinnias always shine. In an age of big to monopoly sized book sellers, keeping the independents going is important. For those interested in some free Illinois flower resources that include nice pictures, consider the following three resources. All the reader need do is click on the link and right click on the mouse to download them to the computer, or with mobile devices, press the download button on the device

Among the first prairie flowers to bloom in the spring, Prairie smoke (Geum triflorum) is found in northern Illinois. Other common names for the flower include old man's whiskers and purple avens. Known for its feathery, smoke like seed heads that give the appearance of a prairie fire. The populations of this plant have dwindled with the loss of native prairie. Used extensively by Native Americans as a medicinal plant. Illinois holds a great diversity of natural habitats and communities, from cypress swamps in the south, beech-maple forests in the east, tallgrass prairies in the central region, steep bluffs and palisades along the western rivers, bogs and wetlands in the northern counties, and numerous other unique natural communities in between. As a state, we are fortunate to have a great legacy of individuals and organizations that have devoted immense time and efforts toward the study, protection, and care of our natural resources. Please join us as we strive to uphold this legacy and share our appreciation of Illinois’ natural treasures with current and future generations.Every five years, the Illinois Endangered Species Protection Board’s (IESPB) Illinois Endangered Species Technical Advisory Committee (ESTAC) meets to discuss potential changes to the status of Illinois plants and makes recommendations for state listing, delisting, or status changes. Read MoreThere are currently seven chapters of the Illinois Native Plant Society. Chapters host programs, hold native plant sales, offer workshops, conduct field trips, and organize symposia. The Society’s Annual Gathering rotates between the chapters and gives members a chance to see vegetation and natural communities in different parts of Illinois. Members are asked to affiliate with a chapter and can choose more than one or all. Check the individual chapter pages for details regarding their calendar of eventsViolets grow in an abundance across Illinois, making them a clear choice for the state flower. The most recognizable and widespread of the native Violets in Illinois is the Dooryard Violet, as it is easy to grow anywhere, in full sunlight or in shade. Most of the 400 to 500 species of Wildflower Violets found around the world prefer moist, shaded areas, often growing beneath hedges where they are protected. (Source: problog.ftdi.com)

 

 

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