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Missouri Evening Primrose

Missouri Evening Primrose

Missouri Evening Primrose

Dwarf Evening Primrose (formerly Oenothera missouriensis) is also known as Missouri Evening Primrose. This tap-rooted perennial produces large, clear yellow flowers that stay open only one day. Plants, however, have a long bloom time, from mid-June through August. Plants are native to the southern and central United States and typically found in poor soils on prairies, cliffs, hillsides, and slopes. Full to partial sun and well-drained soils with dry conditions are preferred. Categories: All Plants A-Z, All Plants Online, Best Perennial Plants for St. Louis Missouri Area, Butterfly Attracting Plants, Deer Resistant Plants, Drought Tolerant Plants, Fragrant Plants, Ground Covers, Illinois Native Plants, Missouri Native Plants, Missouri Native Plants - Online Shop, Missouri Native Plants for the St Louis Area, New and Exciting, New and Exciting 2022, New and Exciting In The Online Shop, Online Shop, Perennial Plants - Online Shop, Perennials, Plant Guides-There's A Plant For That, Preorder Top Plants for Spring 2022 Pickup, Rain Garden Plants, Sun Plants for St Louis Missouri. Tags: Drought Tolerant, Fragrant, Illinois Native, Missouri Native, Naturalize, Rain Gardens.A cherished Missouri and Illinois native perennial, Missouri Evening Primrose, Oenthera marcrocarpa, boasts brilliant large yellow flowers. Low growing, sprawling plants 6-12″ tall produce huge 3-5″ cup-shaped bright yellow flowers. Flowers begin to appear in late spring and will continue into early fall. Oenothera macrocarpa’s delightful softly fragrant blossoms only last one day, usually opening in late afternoon and remaining until the following morning. Stunning winged 2-3″ seed pods follow, creating another amazing display. Its long roots that grow deep into the soil make it extremely drought tolerant. Deer resistant.

The Missouri evening primrose is a flowering perennial of the evening primrose family (Onagraceae), whose natural range extends from the southern USA to Mexico. With preference, it grows on sandy, open places and limestone rocks. When it was brought to England in 1811, it was named Oenothera missouriensis. Today, Oenothera macrocarpa – which translates as the bigfruit evening primrose – is the correct botanical name. It is a particularly attractive flowering species for rock gardens, gravel areas and dry stone walls.Missouri evening primrose is a sprawling herbaceous perennial with multiple stems that trail along the ground. Often seen festooning the tops of bluffs and rocky road cuts. Blooms May through August. Flowers are solitary, very large (up to 4 inches wide), 4-petaled, and bright lemon yellow. Often there are many blooming at once, making this a very showy plant. The flowers last only a day, usually opening in late afternoon and staying open until the next morning. Leaves are narrow and lance-shaped. (Source: mdc.mo.gov)

 

 

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