FutureStarr

Macrocarpa OOR

Macrocarpa OOR

Macrocarpa OOR

Macrocarpa OOR

Miller, John M. (2003). "Claytonia virginica". In Flora of North America Editorial Committee (ed.). Flora of North America North of Mexico (FNA). 4. New York and Oxford – via eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.

Macrocarpa

A Prairie Moon • May 20 Thanks for writing, Rick. Like most woodland plants, Spring Beauty is a very conservative grower from seed. Its bloom time finishes in summer, so the seeds reach the soil then and seem to require over-wintering for two seasons before they will sprout. This can also be achieved with artificial cycles of cold/moist then warm and cold/moist again. Like most perennials, new plants will put more energy into root development than above-ground growth in the first season. Blossoms likely will appear in the second and subsequent seasons. We’ve found that fresh seed performs better, so we keep Claytonia virginica seed refrigerated.

Claytonia virginica is a delicate wildflower native to every county in Illinois. Commonly known as “Eastern Spring beauty,” this attractive wildflower certainly lives up to its name. To sight Claytonia virginica’s distinctive pink stripes in open woodlands signifies that spring has arrived and the woodlands are filled with diverse wildflowers. Claytonia virginica plays a noble role in its natural ecosystem. In order to effectively reseed, Spring beauty subjects itself primarily as a source of food. As mentioned before, insects such as bees and flies frequently visit the flowers seeking nectar and pollen. Small rodents dig up and eat the corms or a system of roots that grow like potato tubers. And as for the foliage, it occasionally becomes a food source for White-Tailed Deer. Spring Beauty acts as a sign that spring has arrived and the woods are filled with diverse wildflowers. An absence of spring beauty from woodlands indicates that the habitat has been subjected to severe degradation due to human exploitation in many cases. (Source: www.lakeforest.edu)

 

 

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