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Long Number Calculator ORR

Long Number Calculator ORR

Long Number Calculator

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Accuracy is excellent, but there are a lot of rounding errors, and the output of taking the root of a number is complicated and time-consuming. For instance, the output of this calculator is misaligned with the input window. It would be worth if that were fixed as to not make it difficult to use. As it is, it's very difficult to tell what is the correct sign, e.g. a minus sign in the result.

Big

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Most scientific and graphing calculators can only display possibly up to 10 decimal places of accuracy. While this is enough in most instances of everyday use, it can be fairly limiting for applications where higher standards of accuracy are necessary. Hence the existence of big number calculators such as the one above, that can provide far higher levels of accuracy. Big numbers are more likely to be used in fields such as cosmology, astronomy, mathematics, cryptography, and statistical mechanics.

The majority of existing calculators are only able to display calculations with up to 10 decimal places of accuracy. Although this is sufficient in the majority of cases, it can be an issue if an application requires a higher degree of accuracy. As such, there is a requirement for big number calculators that can perform calculations to a higher accuracy level. Big numbers are frequently used in fields such as statistical mechanics, cryptography, cosmology, mathematics, and astronomy. (Source: goodcalculators.com)

Number

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The majority of existing calculators are only able to display calculations with up to 10 decimal places of accuracy. Although this is sufficient in the majority of cases, it can be an issue if an application requires a higher degree of accuracy. As such, there is a requirement for big number calculators that can perform calculations to a higher accuracy level. Big numbers are frequently used in fields such as statistical mechanics, cryptography, cosmology, mathematics, and astronomy.

The reason for b) is that numbers that are small enough to fit into a processor register can be dealt with directly by the CPU on a hardware-level, instead of taking a detour through some piece of software, so it’s reasonable to limit number sizes that way, in order to ensure lightning-fast calculations. For Javascript, that means that the largest number that can be handled exactly (meaning without rounding) is (Source: reallifejs.com)

 

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