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I Resume to Work OOR

I Resume to Work OOR

I Resume to Work

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There are a few dominant resume templates in use today: chronological, functional, and hybrid, which is a combination of the two. A chronological resume format lists a candidate's work experience in reverse-chronological order. A functional resume format focuses on highlighting the candidate's skills and achievements, rather than work experience. While the functional resume format can be an attractive option for job seekers with little experience, most employers prefer a chronological or hybrid resume format. Whatever resume format you decide to use, be sure that your format remains consistent throughout the job resume.

Example

If an employer is looking for a graphic designer with mastery in Adobe Creative Suite, for example, you wouldn’t just claim “experience with software for creative professionals.” List the software by name, give your expertise level, and — if you have it — highlight your Adobe Certified Expert (ACE) certification. Likewise, if an employer is searching for an accountant with “experience processing daily invoices and credit,” then use similar language in your resume. Simply listing “gathering receipts” as a duty won’t likely score well with an ATS.

Software proficiency — Almost every office job today requires at least a baseline knowledge of Microsoft Office and G Suite apps for word processing, spreadsheets, email, presentations and collaboration. Many roles will require a far deeper knowledge of technologies. Jobs in the IT and creative fields are obvious examples, but tech proficiency is highly valued in many other sectors and roles. Consider the legal field: 62% of lawyers said in a Robert Half survey that their hiring decisions are influenced more by job candidates' technical abilities than their soft skills. (Source: www.roberthalf.com)

Learn

In lieu of a work experience section, it's best to expand and focus on an education section on your resume to highlight the skills you've developed. What can you do well that this job requires? What will be useful to the hiring company? What have you done in school and what have you studied that has prepared you for assuming this job? This is generally a little easier if you're a college graduate with specialized education, but even a high school graduate can talk about their electives and relevant coursework, why they wanted to take them, and what they learned from the class.

When surveyed, the majority of employers say that they take volunteer experience listed on your resume, such as being a soup kitchen volunteer, into consideration alongside paid work experience. So any volunteer work that highlights your talents or where you learned a new skill should be put on your resume. Only include extracurricular activities and hobbies if they are relevant to the position and have equipped you with transferable skills that would be useful for the job role. (Source:www.topresume.com))

Way

One way to rise above the competition is to make sure that your resume is loaded with employer benefits, not just skills. According to resume expert Peter Newfield, today�s resumes must be "results driven" rather than the skills driven resumes of the past. By reading your resume, the employer must quickly understand what advantages you offer his company. Think of yourself as a product and the employer as the consumer. How would you sell your product (yourself) to the employer?

The ol' catch-22: I need a job to get experience, but I need experience to get a job. Either way, you need a resume, and what you don't need is to panic. Just because you don't have existing skills that are relevant to the job or experience in a traditional work setting doesn't mean you can't craft a convincing first job resume. Whether you're a high school or college student, you may be wondering: How do you write a resume with no work experience? Well, we'll tell you with these expert tips. (Source: www.topresume.com)

 

 

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