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How to Write a Resume Without College Degree

How to Write a Resume Without College Degree

How to Write a Resume Without College Degree

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According to a Recent Study by the Associated Press and MTV, 30% of Job Applicants Have a College Degree. Less Than 1% of Those Applicants Get a Call Back. It’s Time to Rethink the Old Resume Model by Getting More Creative With Your Resume Writing.

College

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Sometimes, you’re rolling along as an undergrad and life (or lack of funds) derails the plan. If you’re taking a short break, like a gap year, and know when you anticipate finishing your degree, you can list that expected date and approach your resume as a current student would. But in other cases, funds or circumstances make finishing your degree impractical and maybe you’ve decided you’re not planning to go back. Or you might intend to go back and complete the degree at some point, but you don’t have a current plan to do so with a clear timeline. Or maybe you discovered that college just isn’t your jam, and you want to focus on other things. That’s A-OK.

Being an executive without a completed degree and just a high school diploma isn’t as uncommon as you may think, though. Many are top performers who have been with their organization for 10+ years and are ready to take on new challenges and opportunities. For example, I spoke with a gentleman recently who has held a multi-unit district manager position at a car title loan company for more than thirteen years. His role touches on business development, human resources, and finance, and now that the company is shrinking and downsizing he is worried about his prospects for making a lateral move or advancing without a college degree. (Source: greatresumesfast.com)

Example

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Try to draw logical connections between the statements you make. For instance, if you say that you understand the goals of the XYZ Corporation and would be good at sales with the company, give specific examples and reasons for thinking so. Reasons could be you have prior experience in the industry, you've done the job before in a different setting, or you understand the importance of sales to the company's goal of increased growth. In short, back up claims of past or intended glory with evidence that you've demonstrated these skills.

Instead of the standard objective, education, experience and skills layout, you might want to compose a résumé that lists skills and training at the top, with bullet points, and then lists education, and after that experience, with one line for each job. Underneath that, you would include two-line descriptions of the work you performed in each job. DeCarlo likes this format, and she offers an example of it here. For this student, an aspiring engineer, she had gleaned that he had accumulated skills in 27 different areas, from fluid mechanics to electromagnetic waves. DeCarlo says it would have been tough to lay out all those skills through job descriptions, and the list at the top has the advantage of including many so-called key words, or descriptive terms that an employer may put in a job listing. Nowadays, big companies screen résumés by computer, and the skills list has the advantage of including many of those key phrases. Though DeCarlo swears by this approach, and insists her counselees have landed many jobs with these types of résumés, I remain ambivalent. The listing of 27 skills seems cluttered and like data overload to me, and I find it confusing to list job descriptions separate from specific jobs. (Source: www.forbes.com)

 

 

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