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How to Write a Resume for Law School Admission Or

How to Write a Resume for Law School Admission Or

How to Write a Resume for Law School Admission Or

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For a law school application resume, the college education section is extremely important. In most job application resumes, listing the basics about your education is good enough – simply write the location, degree earned, GPA, and date of graduation.

Law School

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Being honest on your law school admissions resume can help push your application to the top of the list. After reading literally thousands of resumes, members of the admissions committee are pros at finding the “fluff.” Meaning that adding extra responsibilities in your work experience section or rounding up on your GPA is lying (and they’ll have your transcripts to back it up!). Of course it’s important to put your best foot forward, but if the admissions committee even suspects you’re exaggerating, your resume will be tossed to the bottom of the pile.

Anything else I should do? Yeah! Keep it short. Almost nobody needs more than a single page for their law school résumé (if you think you do, no, you really don’t. OK. Take another look at the first part of this post and if you really need two pages to accomplish what we’ve set out to do, then you do you, man). But getting it all on one page shows schools that you're good at an essential lawyerly skill; analysis. It shows that you were able to comb through all the information scattered behind you like a tail, and you picked out the important parts. Your résumé should make you seem like a curator at a great museum; it highlights the important facts and leaves out the extraneous crap. (Source: www.velocitylsat.com)

GPA

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List your education in reverse chronological order (law school first). Do not include your high school. Include basic information on schools attended, degrees received and dates (or anticipated dates) of graduation, and major field(s) of study. Under your undergraduate school heading, include major and minor areas of study and thesis topics, if applicable. If you desire, include your GPA if impressive. Be consistent. If you use the term “J.D,” then use “B.A.” If you write out “Juris Doctor” then write out “Bachelor of Arts.” Other than law schools, you need not include schools from which you transferred and did not graduate. If you acquired a degree which employers might not recognize by its abbreviation, spell out the degree name.

Grades, Rank and LSAT Scores. Because Berkeley Law does not use a traditional grading system, students do not have GPA’s. Berkeley Law does not rank its students (except for the sole purpose of clerkship applications), and Berkeley Law faculty policy provides that students must not include any representation or estimate of class rank on a resume or in a cover letter. LSAT scores should not be listed on your resume, as they are designed to predict law school performance only, and are not an indicator of professional performance. (Source: www.law.berkeley.edu)

 

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