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How to Send an Updated CV to an Employer

How to Send an Updated CV to an Employer

How to Send an Updated Resume to an Employer

How to Send an Updated Resume to an Employer

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If you're only making minor changes like fixing a typo, adjusting the layout or rephrasing some bullet points then any benefit those changes would have would be more than cancelled out by calling attention to the fact that you didn't do this before you applied. Attention to detail is important in virtually every job and sending or uploading an updated version of your application is basically saying "I wasn't careful enough the first time". You need to keep in mind that if you're making these kinds of changes, you're going to have to be able to answer the question of why you felt the need to send a new version. "I didn't like the formatting" won't cut it as a valid reason.

Use

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Now if you're talking about major issues like using a resume that's two years old, of course, you should send in the correct version because of the damage that mistake could do. Using an old resume will harm your chances much more than simply admitting and correcting mistake. Only draconian managers will refuse to consider you over a mistake since you're only human, but it's usually better to avoid drawing attention. If you sent in a resume that you customised for a different position so that you left off highly relevant information, you're going to have to make a judgement call regarding how much of a difference it could make.

I have actually even read something along the lines of "it would be nice if you updated you uploaded CV regularly, so it is always, well, up to date" or "while you are asked to keep a general CV uploaded, it is still advisable to tailor your CV to an application and use that version instead of the general uploaded one". I think the advice is solid, if you have sent your CV out for an application, but not in general for those online systems where you just keep your CV to be able to apply "quickly" (or to be searched and contacted, supposedly, even without applying). (Source: workplace.stackexchange.com)

Cover Letter

Proofread and send a test email – Carefully check your resume, cover letter (if required), and email message for any spelling, punctuation, or formatting mistakes. Sending yourself a test email can assist you with seeing precisely what your email will resemble the beneficiary, and check to guarantee everything is working appropriately. Download the attachments from your test email and watch that it’s the right document before sending your last resume email to the hiring authority. Adhering to any guidelines given in the portrayal will give your resume the most obvious opportunity with regards to arriving at the correct beneficiary. On the off chance that the depiction doesn’t give directions, keep your message clear, compact, and instructive from the headline to the body text and document name.

"I just hired an assistant and had to review over 250 resumes and cover letters for this position. My ad asked to not send a generic cover letter and to visit our website and explain why their skills are a good fit for us. About 70% of the time they'd shoot off a non-customized resume, and 90% of the time they wouldn't include a cover letter. Because of this lack of following directions, [I] weeded out a huge portion of applicants." – Julie Weinhouse, principal at HERO Entertainment Marketing (Source: www.businessnewsdaily.com)

 

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