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How to Include Current and Expected Salary in Resume OOR

How to Include Current and Expected Salary in Resume OOR

How to Include Current and Expected Salary in Resume

To include salary history on your resume, list your salary history as a range as opposed to including the exact amount you made at each of your previous jobs. For example, you could write something like, "I have made $35,000 to $50,000 in my last three jobs." Just make sure you don't lie and inflate your salary since some companies will check with past employers. Also, only include your salary history if the company explicitly asks for it. If they don't, you should leave it off your resume. To learn how to include your salary requirement on a resume, scroll down!

Interview

At some point, you have to commit. By the second interview (or certainly the third, if the process lasts that long), you’ve likely learned what you need to know about the job and how success will be measured, you’ve met team members, and you’ve shared the salary range you were considering — or the employer has shared the figure they’ve budgeted for the position. The candidate’s compensation expectations, and whether the employer can meet them, remain the only major unsettled questions. So, when an employer now asks you to give your expected salary, you have to be ready to give a number, not a range.

Never misrepresent your experience, your training or the impact you’ve had at your current or previous job. Don’t do it on your resume or in your cover letter, during interviews, or when discussing salary requirements. The truth is bound to come out — maybe during your reference checks, maybe during a skills test, or maybe once the employer sees how you perform at the new job. At some point, it will come out. (Source: www.roberthalf.com)

Information

If an employer requires you to include salary information on your resume, do so on a second page rather than altering your standard format. Title the page "Personal Salary Information" and start with your name and contact information just like the first page of your resume. List each of your employers, the dates you worked, and titles you held for each entry. Add in a few accomplishments after each job title then list your starting and ending salaries. Mention benefits received including health insurance, retirement benefits, stocks and bonuses. The idea is to tie your pay to the role you played and the goals you achieved while there.

Listing your salary on a resume is a delicate task. It can work against you, influencing the employer's perception of your value and cornering you into a low salary for the position. Including salary information on your resume is something that should be done only if specifically requested, and even then it must be handled properly. The question isn't how to show your salary on your resume, but whether you should do it at all. (Source:work.chron.com))

 

 

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