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Growing Hyssop OR.

Growing Hyssop OR.

Growing Hyssop 

Hyssop can be started in containers, indoors or outdoors. If you plant in a container make sure the pot is deep enough to accommodate a large root system. Sow seeds indoors or directly in the garden in early spring. Hyssop prefers full sun to partial shade with a well drained, even dry, soil. You can amend soil with organic matter. Sow seeds just beneath the surface, approximately ¼-inch deep. Germination generally takes between 14 and 21 days, but can take as long as a month, so be patient. Transplant if sown indoors after all threat of frost has passed. Space between 6 inches and 12 inches apart. You can also sow the seeds outdoors in late fall for spring germination.Hyssop blooms in late summer through early autumn with flower spikes of deep blue, red, pink or white. It is a member of the mint family and has a very aromatic somewhat medicinal smell. When the leaves are crushed they have a mint like odor. Because of its medicinal smell Hyssop has a history as a cleansing herb.

Hyssop

Hyssop can be started in containers, indoors or outdoors. If you plant in a container make sure the pot is deep enough to accommodate a large root system. Sow seeds indoors or directly in the garden in early spring. Hyssop prefers full sun to partial shade with a well drained, even dry, soil. You can amend soil with organic matter. Sow seeds just beneath the surface, approximately ¼-inch deep. Germination generally takes between 14 and 21 days, but can take as long as a month, so be patient. Transplant if sown indoors after all threat of frost has passed. Space between 6 inches and 12 inches apart. You can also sow the seeds outdoors in late fall for spring germination. Hyssop, Hyssopus officinalis, is a semi-evergreen shrub in the mint family, yet is less commonly grown than other culinary herbs. It was particularly popular during the Middle Ages, used as a flavouring in soups and stuffings. Now it’s more commonly used in the distillation of certain liquors and to give the famous green colour to absinthe.

However, it’s ideal for using in hearty stews and goes well with meat such as lamb or chicken. Its leaves have a strong flavour so only a few are required when cooking. It makes a good alternative to sage.Nowadays, however, Hyssopus officinalis has a lower profile and is not as widely grown as its cousin mint or culinary herbs such as parsley, sage, and rosemary. But hyssop deserves a spot in your herb garden, where it will attract pollinators, send up spiky purple flowers, and provide you with leaves to make soothing tisanes. As a companion plant in a vegetable garden, its strongly scented leaves can repel aphids. And with a compact, bushy habit, hyssop also is a lovely, front-of-the-border ornamental plant for a Hyssop was once the first herb people thought of growing—used since ancient times for both medicinal and aromatic purposes. The bushy perennial herb’s spiky flowers and scented leaves earned several mentions in the Bible, perhaps most famously invoked in Psalm 57 as a means to banishing transgression: “Cleanse me with hyssop, that I may be pure; wash me, and I will be whiter than snow.”(Source:www.gardenista.com)

 

 

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