FutureStarr

Golden Aster

Golden Aster

Golden Aster

Hairy Golden-aster was first introduced to the Garden by Eloise Butler in the Spring of 1914 with plants she sourced from Columbia Heights MN. She planted more in 1915, then beginning in 1917 she planted them every year through 1928 except for 1921. In her day the classification was Chrysopsis villosa. The species was still in the Garden at the time of Martha Crone's 1951 census. She had noted planting it Sept. 1945 and '46.Maryland golden-aster is a beautiful perennial for the fall border as well as native meadow plantings. Clusters of bright yellow 1” daisy-like flowers bloom from mid-August to mid-October on tidily-clumping plants. Maryland golden-aster grows 12-24” tall with rich green foliage. It is very drought tolerant and is usually found in well-drained sandy soils. It is short-lived; therefore, it needs to reseed for longevity in the garden. It needs full sun to partial shade. Maryland golden-aster grows well in the flower border or the native meadow garden combined with Schizachyrium scoparium, Vernonia acaulis, Pityopsis graminifolia, Asclepias tuberosa, Symphyotrichum laeve var. laeve ‘Bluebird’, and Baptisia australis. The Florida golden aster (Chrysopsis floridana) is one of the many imperiled species found at Lake Manatee State Park. This species of plant is most notable because not only is it recognized as a threatened plant in the state but also on the federal level. The plant became endangered when much of its natural habitat was transformed into land for agricultural use in the 1970s. It wasn’t until 1988 that a plan was made to recover the population of the Florida golden aster and conduct research into its growth. MANAGEMENT AND PROTECTION: There are now a number of sites and thousands of plants under county and state protection. Specifically, Hillsborough County has purchased considerable acreage through the Endangered Land Acquisition and Protection Program that contain several large populations. Golden Aster is also documented from Lake Manatee State Recreation Area and Little Manatee River State Park in Manatee and Hillsborough Counties. Developing management plans for these and other protected sites should receive high priority. Management guidelines should also be developed to control mowing, overgrazing, excessive habitat degradation from off-road vehicle use, and dumping. The plant does not tolerate mowing. In many situations, soil disturbance and removal of overstory vegetation would promote germination and establishment of the species. Long range recovery goals of securing habitat should continue.RANGE AND POPULATION LEVEL: Florida golden aster is currently known from Hardee, Hillsborough, Manatee and Pinellas Counties, Florida. 2004 surveys on Hillsborough County lands have discovered several new populations (Cox et al. 2004). Additional survey will be conducted in 2005 on additional Hillsborough and Manatee Counties land. Systematic surveys should be continued and De Soto and Sarasota Counties should be included in this search. Historic sites include Long Key (St. Petersburg Beach) in Pinellas County, and Bradenton Beach and Bradenton in Manatee County.

A tough sun lover, Heterotheca villosa (Hairy Golden Aster) is an upright rounded perennial forming a bushy clump with over 50 stems crowned with branched clusters of bright yellow daisies, 1 in. across (2.5 cm). Blooming for 3-4 months from late spring to fall, the flowers feature 10 to 20 ray florets enclosing a center of 20-50 orange-brown disc florets. Emitting a pleasant spicy-sharp sage aroma, the sprays of golden flowers attract butterflies but are ignored by deer. The narrow and lance-shaped gray-green leaves are stemless with rounded to tapering bases. Stems and leaves are densely covered rough, whitish hairs. Native to North America and Mexico, Hairy Golden Aster is a highly variable perennial in terms of stem height, leaf base shape, number of flower heads and ray florets. Nine varieties have been recognized. Requiring little water to perform, it is perfect for the dry, sunny garden and thrives on average, even poor soils, as long as they drain well. Providing a long-lasting showy display, this is one of the most drought tolerant daisies for the landscape. There are several plants called “golden aster” in Missouri. Although some native Missouri species used to be considered true asters (in the genus Aster), all have now been completely separated from that Old World genus. Meanwhile, botanists, using DNA evidence and peering closely at details of achene (seed) shape, continue to debate the limits of the genus Heterotheca. As one of the state’s preeminent botanists put it, the situation is “sufficient to cause temporary lightheadedness.” A tough sun lover, Heterotheca villosa (Hairy Golden Aster) is an upright rounded perennial forming a bushy clump with over 50 stems crowned with branched clusters of bright yellow daisies, 1 in. across (2.5 cm). Blooming for 3-4 months from late spring to fall, the flowers feature 10 to 20 ray florets enclosing a center of 20-50 orange-brown disc florets. Emitting a pleasant spicy-sharp sage aroma, the sprays of golden flowers attract butterflies but are ignored by deer. The narrow and lance-shaped gray-green leaves are stemless with rounded to tapering bases. Stems and leaves are densely covered rough, whitish hairs. Native to North America and Mexico, Hairy Golden Aster is a highly variable perennial in terms of stem height, leaf base shape, number of flower heads and ray florets. Nine varieties have been recognized. Requiring little water to perform, it is perfect for the dry, sunny garden and thrives on average, even poor soils, as long as they drain well. Providing a long-lasting showy display, this is one of the most drought tolerant daisies for the landscape. (Source: www.gardenia.net)

 

 

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