FutureStarr

Glomerata

Glomerata

Glomerata

Before flower shoot initiation can take place, plants must be subjected to a period of cold and then receive a photoperiod of at least 12 hours (Beddows, 1959). In Britain, Beddows reported that flowering may begin towards the end of May, is more general in June and may continue into July. Sporadic flowering can continue through autumn and even into winter. Although cross-fertilisation is usual, self fertilisation is possible in some plants: caryopses from outcrosses showed about 10% higher viability than those from inbreeding. At Glomerata, we’re in the business of helping textile, jewelry, and apparel businesses operate more efficiently. We’ve created a line of credit solutions that all start with the same, yet powerful, concept: Businesses that see revenues or profits rise by 15% see the percentage of Glomerata’s fees as 1%. Those that see revenues or profits hit these levels by 20% see the percentage of Glomerata’s fees as as . 5%.

PLANT

Campanula glomerata is a perennial herbaceous plant growing to a height of 20–60 centimetres (7.9–23.6 in), with a maximum of 90 centimetres (35 in). The stem is simple, erect and shortly pubescent, basal leaves are petiolated, oval-lanceolate and lightly heart-shaped (cordate), while cauline leaves are lanceolate, sessile and amplexicaul. The inflorescence is formed by 15-20 sessile, actinomorphic and hermaphrodite single flowers of about 2 to 3 cm. They are in terminal racemes or in the axils of upper leaves, surrounded by an involucre of bracts. The corolla is campanulate and pubescent with five dark violet-blue or purplish-blue petals. Flowering period is from June to September. They are the products of normal oxygen consuming metabolic process in the body. During times of cell stress ROS levels can greatly increase. Because of their highly reactive nature, ROS can cause oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, enzymes, and DNA molecules.[1] While our immune system possesses powerful scavenging potential to avoid excess ROS-induced cellular injury, but with ageing and under influence of external stresses, these mechanisms become inefficient leading to metabolic distress. Hence, free radicals are implicated in several metabolic diseases that include heart diseases, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, diabetes mellitus, arthritis, cancer, ageing, liver disorder etc., the antioxidant therapy has gained an utmost importance in the treatment of these diseases. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 4 billion people (80% of the World's population) use herbal medicines in some aspects of primary healthcare and there is a growing tendency to “Go Natural”.[2] In these aspects, all round the world, the medicinal properties of plants have been investigated and explored for their potent antioxidant activities to counteract metabolic disorders, that are with no side effects and with high economic viability.[3,4,5]

values of aqueous and methanolic extract were found to be 315 ± 05 μg/ml and 220 ± 03 μg/ml, respectively [Table 3]. The results indicate that the methanol extract (220 ± 03 μg/ml) processes potent DPPH scavenging activities. These results indicate that the methanol extracts have a noticeable effect on scavenging free radicals and can be related to the high phenolic constituents present [Table 2]. Phenolic antioxidants are products of secondary metabolism in plants, and the antioxidant activity is mainly due to their redox properties and chemical structure, which can play an important role in chelating transitional metals, inhibiting lipoxygenase and scavenging free radicals.[37] Phenolic compounds are also effective hydrogen donors, which makes them good antioxidants.[38] Although listing several subspecies and varieties, ITIS (2015) says that only two subspecies of D. glomerata – ssp. glomerata and ssp. lobata (Drejer) H. Lindb. - have been accepted. Both The Plant List (2013) and USDA-ARS (2015), however, accept many subspecies – besides the two mentioned they include: ssp. aschersoniana (Graebn.) Thell.; ssp. himalayensis Domin; ssp. hispanica (Roth) Nyman; ssp. juncinella (Bory ex Boiss.) Stebbins & D.Zohary; ssp. lobata (Drejer) H. Lindb.; ssp. lusitanica Stebbins & D. Zohary; ssp. reichenbachii (Hausm. ex Dalla Torre & Sart.) Stebbins & D. Zohary; ssp. smithii (Link) Stebbins & D. Zohary; and ssp. woronowii (Ovcz.) Stebbins & D. Zohary. (Source: www.cabi.org)

 

 

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