FutureStarr

Geranium Deer Resistant

Geranium Deer Resistant

Geranium Deer Resistant

Realizing that no plant is deer proof, plants in the Rarely Damaged, and Seldom Severely Damaged categories would be best for landscapes prone to deer damage. Plants Occasionally Severely Damaged and Frequently Severely Damaged are often preferred by deer and should only be planted with additional protection such as the use of fencing, repellents, etc. Success of any of these plants in the landscape will depend on local deer populations and weather conditions. The only way to completely keep deer from prancing in your garden is to install a deer-proof fence. A fence that is at least 7 feet tall and completely encloses your garden will keep deer from jumping into your garden and eating your plants. You can also install an electric fence or a smaller double-wide fence. We love the sight of deer, just not when they are gnawing on our plants and vegetables. Keep the food of your labour for your family and friends and away from deer.After lovingly and carefully cultivating a garden with geraniums, the last thing you want to deal with is a deer invasion undoing all of your work. Deer are opportunistic mammals that will munch on grass, shrubs and nearly any type of flora that they come across. If you’re worried about deer encroaching on your flower beds and you want to know how to prevent this from happening to you, continue reading.There are many different plants that you can introduce to your garden to diminish a deer’s interest in your geraniums. Harnessing the effectiveness of these plants is widely preferred over view-obstructing fences and adds some eye-catching variety to a landscape. Some plants are toxic to deer (daffodil, foxglove), some offer a texture that they don’t like (lamb’s ear) and others produce such strong scents that deer are more inclined to stay away (sage, basil, mint, lavender). (Fencing isn’t ideal for everybody. The cost and appearance of fencing can be perceived as a detriment, but it is one of the most effective ways of warding off deer. The most popular type of fencing, which you have likely seen, is wire-mesh fencing. These deer fences are made of metal and sometimes polypropylene. Mesh made of polypropylene is nearly invisible, which eliminates the aesthetics issues that some people don’t appreciate where fencing is concerned.Electric fencing is also a popular solution for those who don’t want an eyesore of a fence in their yard. Essentially, these fences use bait to lure deer to posts. Once engaged, these posts then deliver a very small – but surprising – electric shock to the deer. This is less of a barrier and more of a behavior modifier. A deer can quickly be taught to avoid your yard this way, but electric fencing is not regarded as effective as a physical barrier fence.

Getting deer away from your garden is not only good for your garden but good for the people who live around you. Deer cause a tremendous number of auto accidents each year, so that’s another upside to consider when you actively work against deer encroaching on your flowerbeds. If they can’t get to your flowers, they’ll go somewhere else – hopefully, somewhere they won’t cause much grief.The notion that some plants are forever safe from deer is one that gardeners tell themselves for comfort. It is simply not true -- a fact known to everyone who has had "deer-resistant plants" chowed down overnight. However, some plants -- because of their taste or texture -- are less appreciated by deer than others. The geranium "Rozanne" is one such plant, and therefore earns the deer-resistant label it is often given. But experts at Rutgers University only give the plant a deer rating of "occasionally" severely damaged, rather than the "seldom" or "rarely" severely damaged rating.News flash! Sunday morning we discovered that our geraniums -three in a pot- were nearly all denuded. I had just removed a Persian Shield from the geranium pot. Deer don't like Persian Shield I had read, and indeed it thrived unmolested last year. So of course I figured removing it had emboldened the deer to feast on the geraniums. So I put it back in the pot.I would call an arborist to look at your trees for disease and for judicious pruning. I have a heavily wooded yard and know that trees have to be maintained for their own health. Your canopy can be thinned so that more light can get to your lawn area and so that your house can breathe. (This will save your having to paint every other year!). You will still have shade, but will have less moss and mildew on your patio and your siding. (I LOVE my power washer!) To deter deer, fox, skunks, possum, and raccoons you might consider fencing or, as I do, spray deer and rodent repellent (by the gallon!) on your hostas and other tasty plants. (Rub Vicks under your nose to stop your gag reflex!). And remember....the critters ALWAYS win! ;)The best thing I have found to keep deer from eating my flowers, so far, is spraying them with a product called "Deer Out" from my local garden center-not the big box stores. It's a natural product made up of peppermint and garlic oil, white pepper and peutrescents (whole eggs). It does smell bad, not horrific, when you are spraying it on but surprisingly you can't smell it in the garden once it dries. I do reapply if we have had a heavy period of rain . It may not be the most practical if you have an especially big garden but it's the only thing I have found that works so far. (Source: www.houzz.com)

 

 

Related Articles