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Future Stars Halloween

Future Stars Halloween

Future Stars Halloween

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Each year, his little mind is filled with a different type of show. For example, he has been watching old footage of Michael Jackson’s 1988 Motown 25 tour on YouTube and drawing what he sees.

Future

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The drama of death among stars can look pretty eerie at times. This photo of the aging red giant star CW Leonis seems like something out of a Halloween tale. The star looks like it's entrapped inside wispy orange spider webs that wrap around the star. Beams of light shine through the dust, like sunbeams on a partly cloudy day. As it runs out of fuel, the star "burps" shells of sooty carbon that escape into space. The carbon was cooked up in the star's core as a waste product of nuclear fusion. Anyone with a fireplace knows that soot is a nuisance. But carbon ejected into space provides raw material for the formation of future stars, planets, and maybe even life. On Earth, complex biological molecules consist of carbon atoms bonded with other common elements.

The orange-red "cobwebs" are dusty clouds of sooty carbon engulfing the dying star. They were created from the outer layers of CW Leonis being thrown out into the inky black void. The carbon, cooked up through nuclear fusion in the star's interior, gives it a carbon-rich atmosphere. Blasting the carbon back into space provides raw material for the formation of future stars and planets. All known life on Earth is built around the carbon atom. Complex biological molecules consist of carbon atoms bonded with other common elements in the universe. (Source: hubblesite.org)

The entire team at Visit Lake Charles is pleased to be the host for this world class baseball event in the Youth Sports Capital of Louisiana. We invite all team members, family, friends and the community to enjoy the excitement of the games at our sports facilities along with the attractions, food, culture and the great outdoors that Southwest Louisiana has to offer. I also want to encourage the community from around Southwest Louisiana to come out to watch these young men play. I guarantee that several of the participants will be playing major league baseball in the near future. (Source: www.visitlakecharles.org)

At Future Stars we put our players and teams first! We strive to run the most professional and friendly tourneys that your team will ever play in. We hire our own umpires who always increase the player experience and leave teams wanting to come back over and over again! We'll see you on the diamond in 2022! (Source: www.futurestarsofsportsindiana.com)

Star

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A star shines when the outward pressure from the fusion furnace at the core balances against the crush of gravity. When the star runs out of hydrogen fuel, the persistent pull of gravity causes the star to start collapsing. As the core shrinks, the shell of plasma surrounding the core becomes hot enough to begin fusing hydrogen. In addition, pressures and temperatures in the core rise to the point to ignite helium fusion. This generates enough heat to dramatically expand the star's outer layers and swell up into a bloated red giant.

The bright beams of light radiating outwards from CW Leonis are one of the star's most intriguing features. They've changed in brightness within a 15-year period — an incredibly short timespan in astronomical terms. Astronomers speculate that gaps in the dust shrouding CW Leonis may allow beams of starlight to pierce through and illuminate dust, like searchlight beacons through a cloudy sky. However, the exact cause of the dramatic changes in their brightness is as yet unexplained. (Source: hubblesite.org)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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