FutureStarr

Future Star Wars Novels

Future Star Wars Novels

Future Star Wars Novels

Future Star Wars Novels

“A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away. . ”. Those words, familiar to even the youngest of Star Wars fans, begin every episode of one of the most popular science fiction film franchises of all time.

Novels

And canonicity is a big deal for Star Wars. When Disney first bought Lucasfilm, they declared all previous Star Wars comics, novels, games, and cartoons (except for the long-running Star Wars: The Clone Wars) as non-canon “legends” of the Star Wars galaxy. The move was made to offer maximum freedom to the filmmakers involved in the Sequel Trilogy (Star Wars: The Force Awakens, The Last Jedi, and Rise of Skywalker), but it didn’t take long for “Legends” characters and ideas to seep back into programs like Star Wars Rebels and The Mandalorian. And, as you will see in this guide to Star Wars’s streaming and theatrical future below, those senses of canon and continuity are as important to the galaxy far, far away as the Force itself.

But when it comes to that expanded universe, Star Wars films aren’t just beholden to expectation — they’re also small singularities, taking up all the oxygen in the constellation of Star Wars releases and making sure that a vast majority of the multimedia entries exist primarily to support the latest blockbuster. Comics like The Rise of Kylo Ren by Charles Soule and Will Sliney spin out of The Rise of Skywalker; books like Phasma by Delilah S. Dawson lead into The Last Jedi; Rogue One got a tie-in novel called Catalyst by James Luceno. The need to only produce tie-in projects can obscure creators’ work, and warp their goals: When every book is promoting a movie, it’s hard not to see them as promotional material first, and individual stories second. (Source: www.polygon.com)

Star

The pivot seems to be complete: In early November, Disney removed the previously announced Rogue Squadron film from the company’s release schedule due to scheduling conflicts from director Patty Jenkins, who has two unrelated films set to begin production soon. Other film projects that are theoretically still on the table seem to have evaporated: a movie from Marvel Studios’ Kevin Feige, a trilogy from The Last Jedi’s Rian Johnson, as well as a film from Thor: Ragnarok’s Taika Waititi. Like Jenkins, these are all very busy filmmakers with lots of other projects confirmed. Without any evidence that these Star Wars projects are progressing, it’s hard to believe any of them will actually land on release schedules anytime soon. Good, I say. Star Wars is at its best when the franchise isn’t producing new movies.

When it comes to the Star Wars franchise, the movies are considered the sacred texts. Even though Star Wars sprawls into every medium, there’s a level of scriptural reverence for the film trilogies that extends to how they’re marketed. A Star Wars “Episode” isn’t just a movie; it’s an event, in a way virtually nothing else is these days. Being a Star Wars fan is far and away the most mainstream kind of genre fan you can be, and the movies — at least, the movies as they exist now — are meant to cater to each and every one of those fans. (Source: www.polygon.com)

 

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