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Future Star Gymnastics Leotard

Future Star Gymnastics Leotard

Future Star Gymnastics Leotard

Future Star Gymnastics Leotard

I stopped by the Future Star Gymnastics, which is a new club opening up downtown. Not surprisingly, they were staffed with volunteers, which seemed completely against the trend of paying employees.

Leotard

Gymnastics attire is a fraught subject, as gymnasts are elite athletes and deserve to be observed and admired above all for their abilities, not their bodies. Furthermore, many in the sport, from the neighborhood gym all the way up to the international elite level, are underage. As such, it should go without saying that it’s especially inappropriate to focus on these athletes’ bodies. And yet—as Jerry Seinfeld put it in his 1993 tome SeinLanguage when he suggested that corporate sponsors affix logos on leotard posteriors for maximum visibility—it is hard to ignore that the standard uniform for regulation competition is revealing.

slate.com)While the wrenching exposé of sexual abuse forced the sport to adopt some hard-fought progress toward offering its athletes dignity, comfort, and autonomy, when it comes to valuing performance over aesthetics, women’s artistic gymnastics still lags behind other sports. Case in point: Track and field, swimming, and even rhythmic gymnastics all now enjoy the widespread popularity of legs covered in high-tech fabric, thus allowing athletes to concentrate fully on their sport (and, in some cases, improving their outcomes). And, depending on the event, male gymnasts have also been competing in stirrup pants or shorts over their singlets (that’s a male version of the leotard; now you know) for decades. (Source:

Gymnastics

While the wrenching exposé of sexual abuse forced the sport to adopt some hard-fought progress toward offering its athletes dignity, comfort, and autonomy, when it comes to valuing performance over aesthetics, women’s artistic gymnastics still lags behind other sports. Case in point: Track and field, swimming, and even rhythmic gymnastics all now enjoy the widespread popularity of legs covered in high-tech fabric, thus allowing athletes to concentrate fully on their sport (and, in some cases, improving their outcomes). And, depending on the event, male gymnasts have also been competing in stirrup pants or shorts over their singlets (that’s a male version of the leotard; now you know) for decades.

slate.com)And yet: In the sport’s formidable Code of Points, there is a deduction (anywhere from 0.20 to 0.50, depending on the severity of the “attire” or “behavioural” violation) for a gymnast adjusting a garment any time between the salutes to the judges that signify the official start and end of her judged exercise. That is: There’s no inscribed deduction in gymnastics for getting the inevitable wedgie—but there is a deduction, sometimes hefty, for fixing your wedgie. This means that gymnasts not only do painful things like glue leos to their skin, but that they are, at times, essentially forced to complete routines with one or both buttocks hanging out. This is especially the case in college, where the combination of higher-cut garments and more mature bodies means that every single NCAA meet is a booty-fest we all see, but rarely talk about. (Source:

 

 

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