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Elymus virginicus

Elymus virginicus

Elymus virginicus

Various insects feed on Virginia Wild Rye and other species in the Elymus genus, including leafhoppers, aphids, and leaf beetles. Caterpillars of various leaf miner moths mine the leaves of these grasses, and caterpillars of the False Wainscot Moth also eat the leaves. Livestock may forage on Virginia Wild Rye, however as the plant matures, seedheads of Virginia Wild Rye may be sharp and can cause injury to grazing animals so they generally leave it alone later in the season. In a garden setting or a prairie, the sharp awns could pose a risk to pets.

Elymus

A Prairie Moon • June 19 10 pounds per acre would give you a solid stand of Elymus, assuming good planting conditions and germination. That is probably thicker than you want, depending on your end plan. If this is in preparation for a future seeding of woodland forbs, you would want much less. If it is to manage weeds in woodland, it could be effective at a high population.Elymus virginicus L. var. virginicus is known from CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT.E. virginicus var. halophilus (Bickn.) Wieg. is known from CT, MA, ME, NH, RI.E. virginicus var. intermedius (Vasey ex Gray) Bush is known from CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT.E. virginicus var. jejunus (Ramaley) Bushis known from CT, MA, ME, NH. Varieties intermedius and jejunus are less common than the other varieties.

Elymus virginicus is distinguished by its erect spike, the base often partially enclosed in the uppermost sheath; 2 spikelets per node; usually 3 or 4 florets per spikelet; glumes and lemmas both awned and usually hairless, sometimes glaucus; both glumes nearly equal in size, .7 to 2.3 mm wide (widest glumes 1+ mm), thickened and often distinctly bowed at the base; florets and glumes both drop off at maturity; 4 to 9 leaves that are floppy, hairless, up to about 15 mm wide.There are 4 vars of Elymus virginicus, though not all are universally recognized: var. intermedius, has hairy spikelets and is usually glaucus; var. virginicus spikes are usually partially sheathed, glumes to 2.3 mm wide, glume base is hardened for up to 4 mm and strongly bowed, plants are not glaucus; var. jejunus spikes are not sheathed, glumes to 1.5 mm wide, glume base hardened for 1 mm and not strongly bowed, plants usually at least somewhat glaucus; var. halophilus spikes not sheathed, glumes to 1.5 mm wide, glume base hardened for up to 2 mm, leaves only up to 9 mm wide, plants often strongly glaucus. Only vars virginicus and jejenus are considered to be in Minnesota; var. virginicus is likely the more common of the two. (Source: www.minnesotawildflowers.info)

 

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