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Data Size OR

Data Size OR

Data Size

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168 bytes / 163 bytes

Data

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The jump from small business to mid-size and enterprise-level business is a large one, particularly when it comes to data storage needs. It’s important to consider not only budget restraints, but physical limitations as well. Digital storage requires physical servers, hard drives, cables, and other technology that needs to be stored. When your business starts needing to store petabytes, exabytes, or even zettabytes of data, you’re going to need a lot of hardware. It’s big decision to make, and it’s important to weigh the pros and cons of the different methods available to you. There are also options to rely on the resources of other companies and store your data in the cloud.

Early computers used a variety of four-bit binary-coded decimal (BCD) representations and the six-bit codes for printable graphic patterns common in the U.S. Army (FIELDATA) and Navy. These representations included alphanumeric characters and special graphical symbols. These sets were expanded in 1963 to seven bits of coding, called the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) as the Federal Information Processing Standard, which replaced the incompatible teleprinter codes in use by different branches of the U.S. government and universities during the 1960s. ASCII included the distinction of upper- and lowercase alphabets and a set of control characters to facilitate the transmission of written language as well as printing device functions, such as page advance and line feed, and the physical or logical control of data flow over the transmission media. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Size

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We coined the word byte to refer to a logical set of bits less than a full word size. At that time, it was not defined specifically as x bits but typically referred to as a set of 4 bits, as that was the size of most of our coded data items. Shortly afterward, I went on to other responsibilities that removed me from SAGE. After having spent many years in Asia, I returned to the U.S. and was bemused to find out that the word byte was being used in the new microcomputer technology to refer to the basic addressable memory unit.

Bytes are the typical base unit of information. Larger files will typically have their sizes expressed using kilobyte, megabyte or gigabyte depending upon how large the file is. While these larger units are not as accurate as the byte size, most operating systems will expose the true byte size of a file by inspecting the file properties directly. Command line tools can also expose the exact byte size as well. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

 

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