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Coreopsis Leaves

Coreopsis Leaves

Coreopsis Leaves

Coreopsis lanceolata, commonly called lanceleaf coreopsis, is a native wildflower that typically grows to 2' tall and occurs in prairies, glades, fields, and roadsides. Plants in the genus Coreopsis are sometimes commonly called tickseed in reference to the resemblance of the seeds to ticks. It prefers full sun with moist, well-drained soil but can sprawl if grown in too fertile soil. It can be an aggressive self-seeder and will form colonies and should be planted in areas where this would not be a problem. Deadheading of spent flowers will help control self-seeding and encourage additional blooms. Division may be needed every 2-3 years to maintain robustness. They can be cut back hard if they become too sprawly. Many cultivars of this species are available, including hybrids with Coreopsis grandiflora.Thread Leaf Coreopsis is a native perennial in the daisy family that grows in dense bushy clumps. It may grow 2-3 feet tall with a similar spread. Plants thrive in infertile sandy and rocky soils and tolerate drought, low levels of salt, infertile soil, heat, and humidity. If the soil is too rich or moist, stems become weak and plants tend to flop. The clumps will spread by rhizomes and can be divided every 2-3 years. It will also self-seed. Shearing the plant after blooming will sometimes produce fall flowers. Native to North America, coreopsis plants grow in upright clumps and feature masses of bright, showy, daisy-like flowers throughout the summer. The foliage of the species varies, with some varieties boasting large green leaves and others sporting narrower greenery. One of the plant's common names, tickseed, is a nod to its round seeds, which resemble ticks. Birds and other wildlife love to snack on the seeds during the fall and winter, while bees and butterflies are drawn to the colorful blooms. Overall, coreopsis plants don’t require much care when grown in their preferred environment. Select a planting site that gets lots of sun and has good soil drainage. Also, don't forget to account for the mature size of your species—when planting, leave some space around each plant for air circulation. The taller coreopsis varieties might need staking as they mature; otherwise, the stems might flop over. Moreover, deadheading your plants (removing the spent blooms) can keep the plant blooming throughout summer and into fall.

Many coreopsis varieties can be grown from seed and often will reseed themselves in your garden. Start seeds indoors six to eight weeks before your area's projected last frost date, or directly plant seeds in your garden after your last frost. Plant the seeds roughly 1/2-inch deep, and keep the soil lightly moist and warm. Seedlings should emerge in about two to three weeks, at which point you can put the seedlings by a sunny window and continue to keep the soil lightly moist. Indoor seedlings will need to be slowly acclimatized to the outdoors by taking them outside for long stretches each day for about a week. Then, they’re ready to be planted in the garden.Introduced to Japan and China as an ornamental species and later used extensively in greenification projects, particularly along river banks and railways, Coreopsis lanceolata is now known to be outcompeting native plant life and has since 2006 been labeled an invasive species by the Invasive Alien Species Act. The cultivation, transplantation, sale, or purchase of Coreopsis lanceolata is now prohibited and the plant has become the subject of a nationwide destruction campaign, even earning a spot on the Ecological Society of Japan's 100 Worst Invasive Species list. Lanceleaf coreopsis has been a long time favorite of both beginning and advanced gardeners. It is easily propagated from seed and as is typical of many native wildflowers, it is often not until the second year when numerous blooms are formed. This wildflower prefers full sun and does best in well-drained soil. Its self-seeding nature makes it a perfect candidate for prairie, meadow, and native wildflower plantings. When conditions are right it will grow into large colonies and produce showy yellow flower carpets. As long as the seed heads are removed it will also do well growing in a border. Lanceleaf coreopsis is a very dependable and prolific flowering native perennial. It has few problems with insects or disease and will thrive in conditions of high heat, drought and humidity. (Source: www.fs.fed.us)

 

 

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