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college student resume expected graduation date

college student resume expected graduation date

college student resume expected graduation date

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For a current student such as yourself, it's considered a best practice to include your expected graduation date on your resume when applying for entry-level jobs. An expected graduation date tells potential employers how far along you are in your degree or diploma. It also helps employers understand the amount of flexibility you may need around your work schedule. Read on to find out how to add your expected graduation date to your resume.

Education

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According to North Carolina State University, education should be listed above experience, if you're still in school. Below education, add your anticipated diploma or degree and the your expected graduation date in parentheses. If you're attaining a bachelor of science in engineering degree, for example, list this way: "Bachelor of Science (Expected June 2014)." Beneath your anticipated degree and expected graduation date, add the school from which you're graduating, followed by your grade point average.

Purdue University's Online Writing Lab (OWL) advises soon-to-be graduates to list education near the top of their resume if it is the strongest qualification for a job. The OWL's example of how an expected graduation would might look is: "Purdue University: Candidate for B.S. in Engineering. GPA 3.2. Expected to Graduate in June 2014." Only GPAs of 3.0 or better should be listed on your resume, OWL says. (Source: careertrend.com)

Section

While you're still in school or even a recent graduate, place your education section above your experience section. At this early stage in your career, education holds the most relevance, especially as graduation approaches. After 2-3 years when your experience supersedes your education, update your resume and switch the two sections.

Some educational entries require more information than others. Keeping the same formatting, in this case, might cause clutter, creating confusion as employers read through it. Instead, consider breaking up a larger section into subsections. While the main section includes your degree, subsections include more specifics such as awards, recognitions and certifications. (Source: www.indeed.com)

 

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