FutureStarr

clinical research associate resume template

clinical research associate resume template

clinical research associate resume template

via GIPHY

Jobs range from bachelor’s degree entry-level CRAs with a description as follows: “responsible for assisting the clinical operations function and personnel assigned to the planning, execution and data collection activities on assigned clinical projects,” to more specialized jobs, such as Senior Research Associate Bioanalytical Development, with a description of “design and develop a broad range of bioanalytical assays including immunoassays (PK, ADA and occasionally biomarkers) and cell-based neutralizing antibody assays for protein and antibody-based therapeutics in compliance with GLP and regulatory guidance to support clinical and early development studies.”

Professional

via GIPHY

Clinical research associates (CRAs) are professionals who make sure prescription and non-prescription drugs are safe for public use. Since they supervise clinical trials, their resumes typically express their skills in communication, organization and documentation. If you're thinking about applying to a CRA job, consider preparing a resume that can impress potential employers and convince them you're an excellent candidate for their job opening. In this article, we discuss what a clinical research associate resume is, what you should include in one and how to write one in seven steps, with a template and example.

A clinical research associate resume is a document that a person submits when they're applying for a CRA job. It outlines the person's professional background, including their education level, work experience and skills. A CRA is a professional who manages a clinical trial, the process of testing the safety and effectiveness of a medicinal drug before releasing it to the market. They work with contract research organizations (CRO), groups that fund clinical trials, like pharmaceutical companies, universities, government agencies, medical research institutions or other health organizations. (Source: www.indeed.com)

Manager

There are a couple exceptions to this. First, if you started your career thirty years ago and prior to that cut-off did some amazing things or worked for well-known companies, they should be included. If you were the founder of a startup in the 1980s, like, oh, Genentech, that certainly is worthwhile. Or if, in an early part of your career you were working for companies like IBM , Apple , Sanofi , Shire , JP Morgan Chase, etc. It’s a judgement call. It’s also perfectly acceptable, if you give the most current jobs a lot of detail, then for older jobs, including something along the lines of: Additional employment includes Research Assistant (University of Alaska, 1980-1990), Laboratory Manager (Honolulu Diagnostics, 1991-1994), etc.

One of the big things they bring is experience, of course. A pro will actually have read dozens or literally hundreds of resumes. That helps. In fact, it helps a lot, because you don’t have to read that many before you get a handle on what works and what doesn’t. Experienced managers who have spent years hiring people will have had an opportunity to at least read several dozen resumes. How many have you read? If you’re like most people, you’ve only seen a couple. There are hundreds of good examples of clinical research resumes, as well as formats and templates online, so if you don’t want to hire someone with experience, seriously consider spending some time online reading sample resumes. It won’t be long before you get a sense of what works. (Source: www.biospace.com)

 

Related Articles