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Circle Onion Allium OOR

Circle Onion Allium OOR

Circle Onion Allium OOR

Most of us don’t think of onions as beautiful plants, but onions have some very close cousins that definitely deserve a place in your flower garden. Fast-growing ornamental alliums grow tall and have round flower heads composed of dozens of star-shaped flowers. While these plants are not edible, their leaves do have a slight onion-like scent when crushed.I am super Obsess with these allium, and the way they start giving me a beautiful border. I couldn't help but to but more for the new secret garden , for my ground they settled so well and reproduced so fast i was able to even divide already, less then a yr in. the new one I was able to do the same before placing them in the ground. a must have in the garden.

Allium

The majority of alliums are bulb-forming; however, there is a handful that grows from rhizomes, the way common chives (Allium schoenoprasum) do. These may never form any kind of bulb. Allium leaves tend to be long and strappy. Some—like the cork-screw allium—remain attractive all season, with a blue-green color that complements the flowers. Most early blooming alliums have foliage that tends to die-back early, as the plants go dormant for the summer.There are more than 700 different types of alliums in the world. It wasn't until the late 1800s that this vast group of plants started to intrigue plant lovers. Russian botanists began collecting some of the spectacular alliums from Central Asia and introducing them to avid horticulturists through the Imperial Botanical Garden in St. Petersburg. Of course, it didn't take long for the consummate plant hunters, the British, to get wind of this "new" family of garden-worthy plants. Their expeditions yielded many more interesting alliums varieties.

Just remember, there's only one time of year you can plant alliums: in the fall. Daffodils, tulips and crocuses are easy to find at most garden centers, but alliums are not as readily available. To make sure you have the bulbs in hand when it's time to plant, the best thing to do is order them by mail. That way, they'll show up at your door at proper planting time, and there's no chance you'll have to live another year without these beautiful, long-lasting, bee-friendly flowers in your garden. Some ornamental alliums grow more like chives and what you plant is a clump of roots rather than bulbs. This type of allium is usually sold as a potted plant, and may be more available in spring than fall. Globemaster and Gladiator: The tallest and most architectural alliums have huge, globe-shaped flowerheads on 3- to 4-foot stems. Bloom time is early to mid-June. A group of deep-purple Globemaster or Gladiator alliums is a real eye-catcher, especially when planted with white or pink peonies, delphiniums or tall bearded iris. The white-flowering Mount Everest is a bit shorter and looks sharp in front of shrubs with deep-green or burgundy foliage or rising out of a groundcover of periwinkle (Vinca minor). (Source: www.gardeners.com)

 

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