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Can You Get Moon Burn OR

Can You Get Moon Burn OR

Can You Get Moon Burn

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If you like dry, crumbly raisins, dried blueberries, or any other dried and intensely flavored food, the answer will be yes. Not all dried food is the same, though, and there’s a really good chance that you might not know what exactly you’re eating if you encounter something unfamiliar at a store or a restaurant.Can you get a moonburn? That's a good question, but first let me explain a moonburn. I'm assuming that everyone is very familiar with a sunburn. In fact, you've probably had several sunburns in your life. A sunburn occurs when your skin is exposed to the Sun for too long of a time. The UV radiation from the Sun that is not absorbed by the ozone layer reaches your skin and causes damage. Too much damage and your skin turns red. More dangerous yet is the deep tissue damage that can occur from overexposure to the Sun. This can lead to skin cancer later on in life.

Sun

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So why is a moonburn not possible? The amount of light reflected off the surface of the Moon and received by Earth is MUCH, MUCH less than received directly from the Sun. The reflected light from the Moon is 500,000 LESS intense than light directly from the Sun. In addition, the Moon does not reflect UV light as well as visible light, so the amount of UV light reflected off the lunar surface is even less. There just isn't enough UV light reaching Earth's surface from the Moon to produce a moonburn. Could a vampire get moonburn tho? Like say that the reason they die when exposed to the sun is because of their lower tolerance to UV rays, would that mean that the moon would be like the Sun is to humans? I mean, the light and UV rays that come direct from the Sun is 400,000 times more intense, it would explain why they burn so much when exposed to sunlight. If the Sun was 400,000 times more intense than it already is, we'd be walking around dying with our skin sliding off so that's probably why it would happen to vampires, yeah?

Research using data from NASA's ARTEMIS mission — short for Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun — suggests how the solar wind and the Moon's crustal magnetic fields work together to give the Moon a distinctive pattern of darker and lighter swirls. Lunar swirls, like the Reiner Gamma lunar swirl imaged here by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, could be the result of solar wind interactions with the Moon's isolated pockets of magnetic field. This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/13150 Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Genna DubersteinThese small bubbles of magnetic "sunscreen" can also deflect solar wind particles — but on a much smaller scale than Earth's magnetic field. While they aren’t enough to protect astronauts by themselves, they do have a fundamental effect on the Moon’s appearance. Under these miniature magnetic umbrellas, the material that makes up the Moon's surface, called regolith, is shielded from the Sun's particles. As those particles flow toward the Moon, they are deflected to the areas just around the magnetic bubbles, where chemical reactions with the regolith darken the surface. This creates the distinctive swirls of darker and lighter material that are so prominent they can be seen from Earth — one more piece of the puzzle to help us understand the neighbor NASA plans to re-visit within the next decade. (Source: solarsystem.nasa.gov)

 

 

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