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Brown Eyed Sue OOR

Brown Eyed Sue OOR

Brown Eyed Sue

Echinacea angustifolia (Narrow-leaf Coneflower) is a compact perennial boasting a profusion of daisy flowers, 3 in. across (7 cm), in early to midsummer and sometimes throughout the rest of the summer. The charming flowers feature pale pink to purple rays drooping from a dome-shaped central orange disk. The cone-shaped flower heads attract bees and butterflies. If they are not removed in the fall, they will be visited by birds that feed on the seeds. The flowers are borne atop stout, upright, hairy, unbranched stems clad with narrow, oblong gray-green leaves. Narrow-leaved Coneflower grows from a fragile but very deep taproot. It is not rhizomatous so the plant does not spread vegetatively. Drought, heat, humidity and poor soil tolerant, Narrow-leaf Coneflower is easy to grow and is a suitable addition to a prairie garden and attractive in flower arrangements.

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Echinacea angustifolia (Narrow-leaf Coneflower) is a compact perennial boasting a profusion of daisy flowers, 3 in. across (7 cm), in early to midsummer and sometimes throughout the rest of the summer. The charming flowers feature pale pink to purple rays drooping from a dome-shaped central orange disk. The cone-shaped flower heads attract bees and butterflies. If they are not removed in the fall, they will be visited by birds that feed on the seeds. The flowers are borne atop stout, upright, hairy, unbranched stems clad with narrow, oblong gray-green leaves. Narrow-leaved Coneflower grows from a fragile but very deep taproot. It is not rhizomatous so the plant does not spread vegetatively. Drought, heat, humidity and poor soil tolerant, Narrow-leaf Coneflower is easy to grow and is a suitable addition to a prairie garden and attractive in flower arrangements. Narrow-leaved Coneflower is a showy perennial of dry prairies and rocky barrens in the tallgrass prairie and Great Plains regions. Its flowers are similar to the more commonly planted Ecinacea purpurea- Purple Coneflower, but the leaves set it apart at 1/2 inch to 1 inch across, compared to 2-3 inch wide leaves of Purple Coneflower. The threatened Ottoe Skipper's life cycle depends greatly on Echinacea angustifolia, and drier prairie grasses such as Little Bluestem, Side-oats Grama and Prairie Dropseed. This flower is deer resistant and attracts many pollinators. It is also drought tolerant.

Narrow-leaved Coneflower is a showy perennial of dry prairies and rocky barrens in the tallgrass prairie and Great Plains regions. Its flowers are similar to the more commonly planted Ecinacea purpurea- Purple Coneflower, but the leaves set it apart at 1/2 inch to 1 inch across, compared to 2-3 inch wide leaves of Purple Coneflower. The threatened Ottoe Skipper's life cycle depends greatly on Echinacea angustifolia, and drier prairie grasses such as Little Bluestem, Side-oats Grama and Prairie Dropseed. This flower is deer resistant and attracts many pollinators. It is also drought tolerant.A fun fact about Narrow-leaved Coneflower is that, in 1805, Lewis and Clark sent Thomas Jefferson samples of it from Fort Mandan in what is now North Dakota. It was a plant prized by the Native Americans as a remedy for rattlesnake bites. (Source: www.prairiemoon.com)

 

 

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