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Boat Speed Calculator ORR

Boat Speed Calculator ORR

Boat Speed Calculator

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I've seen a lot of sites like these, but I don't know what spec they're testing in. I am well below the threshold but I'm not sure if I should choose the standard or passenger speed

Speed

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A boat's hull speed limits how fast it can travel efficiently. When traveling at hull speed, the boat's bow wave and stern wave have synchronized and constructive interference occurs, which allows the boat to move very efficiently. However, at speeds greater than hull speed, a vessel's nose automatically starts rising as the vessel tries to climb its bow wave. This process is called planing, and it wastes lots of energy. Trying to move faster than the hull speed will therefore require more and more thrust (whether that comes from sails, rowing, or engines) in exchange for smaller and smaller gains in speed as more energy is wasted angling the boat upwards. Hull speed can therefore be said to impose a flat limit on how fast a sailboat can go.

Why does this formula exist and the other formula as well? This calculation is older and not as accurate. For instance, your waterline length can actually change as your speed increases. Thus, the accuracy is very suspect. Plus, when you add power sufficient enough to overcome hull drag, this number no longer applies. That means when you’re using your motor for propulsion, our original equation is far more useful. This one here is really more something you should be aware of. You may find it when you Google boat speeds and wonder why the different formulas exist. Even boat manufacturers ignore this calculation these days. It just doesn’t apply to modern boat making in any reasonable way. (Source: www.boatsafe.com)

Boat

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Why does this formula exist and the other formula as well? This calculation is older and not as accurate. For instance, your waterline length can actually change as your speed increases. Thus, the accuracy is very suspect. Plus, when you add power sufficient enough to overcome hull drag, this number no longer applies. That means when you’re using your motor for propulsion, our original equation is far more useful. This one here is really more something you should be aware of. You may find it when you Google boat speeds and wonder why the different formulas exist. Even boat manufacturers ignore this calculation these days. It just doesn’t apply to modern boat making in any reasonable way.

Worse, if you are in an accident with an overpowered engine, the fault could automatically become yours. You may be considered responsible or negligent for damage caused as a result. Your insurance will not cover you and the result could be lawsuits coming your way. As such, check with any state boating regulations before you commit to anything. No sense spending time and money on something you can’t or shouldn’t do. (Source: www.boatsafe.com)

 

 

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