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Blue toadflax

Blue toadflax

Blue toadflax

The flowers are pollinated by bumblebees and other long-tongued bees. Butterflies and skippers may visit the flowers for nectar, but they are less likely to be effective at cross-pollination. The caterpillars of the butterfly Junonia coenia (Buckeye) feed on the foliage of Blue Toadflax and many other members of the Figwort family. A stink bug, Cosmopepla carnifex Fab., has been found on the foliage of this species in sand prairies.

Blue

Blue Toadflax has reasonably attractive foliage and flowers. Its appearance is very similar to Nuttallanthus texensis (Southern Blue Toadflax), but the latter has larger flowers (up to 1" long) and bumpy seeds. Blue Toadflax is also related to the introduced Linaria vulgaris (Yellow Toadflax), but the latter has larger yellow flowers (up to 1" long or more). There are other Toadflaxes from Eurasia that occur primarily in sterile waste areas, but they usually have smaller flowers (�" or less). Blue Toadflax superficially resembles Lobelia kalmii (Kalm's Lobelia), but the flowers of the latter lack nectar spurs and it usually blooms later in the year. Another scientific name for Blue Toadflax is Linaria canadensis. The Linaria canadensis, otherwise called Blue Toadflax, is a short growing native annual or biennial.

It is a very lanky plant, amounting to 2 feet tall with a lively blue blossom on the tips of the flowering stems. It is common for this species to grow one main stock, and have multiple stocks coming off the central one. The seeds are very tiny, an approximate count has over 1 million in an ounce! The Blue Toadflax also goes by the common names: Old-field Toadflax and Canada Toadflax. In addition, it is also called Nuttallanthus canadensis. Also known as Canadian toadflax, Blue toadflax is an annual (or occasionally biennial) wildflower that forms a delicate sea of lavender when in bloom. Blooms are light purple with a white patch. Leaves are refined and narrowly linear. Stems are erect and take on a reddish hue. Blue toadflax is common along roadsides, in pastures and in other disturbed areas. It is sometimes confused with lyreleaf sage (Salvia lyrata) because of its similar growth habit and bloom color, and because they often grow together. (Source: www.flawildflowers.org)

 

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