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Meadowsweet has been used historically for a wide variety of conditions. It is reputed to break fevers and to promote sweating during a cold or flu. Meadowsweet contains salicylates, which possibly give the herb an aspirin-like effect, particularly in relieving aches and pains during a common cold. While not as potent as willow , which has a higher salicin content, the salicylates in meadowsweet do give it a mild anti-inflammatory effect and the potential to reduce fevers during a cold or flu . However, this role is based on historical use and knowledge of the chemistry of meadowsweet's constituents; to date, no human studies have been completed with meadowsweet.

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While not as potent as willow , which has a higher salicin content, the salicylates in meadowsweet do give it a mild anti-inflammatory effect and the potential to reduce fevers during a cold or flu. However, this role is based on historical use and knowledge of the chemistry of meadowsweet's constituents; to date, no human studies have been completed with meadowsweet.However, this role is only based on historical use and knowledge of the chemistry of meadowsweet's constituents, and to date, no human trials have examined the therapeutic potential of meadowsweet.

Unfortunately, to achieve an aspirin-like effect, one would realistically need to consume about 50–60 grams of meadowsweet daily. This means that willow bark extracts standardized to salicin are a far more practical as a potential herbal substitute for aspirin for minor aches and pains or mild fevers. Tinctures, 2–4 ml three times per day, may alternatively be used.The first part of the scientific name ‘Filipendula’ comes from Latin and means ‘hanging by a thread’. This refers to the way the root tubers hang on the fibrous roots – a characteristic of this genus. The second part of the scientific name ‘ulmaria’ describes how the leaves of Meadowsweet resemble those of the elm (Ulmus). (Source: www.conservationhandbooks.com)

FILIPENDULA

Bismuth subsalicylate contains salicylates. Various herbs including meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria), poplar (Populus tremuloides), willow (Salix alba), and wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens) contain salicylates as well. Though similar to aspirin , plant salicylates have been shown to have different actions in test tube studies. Furthermore, salicylates are poorly absorbed and likely do not build up to levels sufficient to cause negative interactions that aspirin might. No reports have been published of negative interactions between salicylate-containing plants and aspirin or aspirin-containing drugs. Therefore concerns about combining salicylate-containing herbs remain theoretical, and the risk of causing problems appears to be low.

The first part of the scientific name ‘Filipendula’ comes from Latin and means ‘hanging by a thread’. This refers to the way the root tubers hang on the fibrous roots – a characteristic of this genus. The second part of the scientific name ‘ulmaria’ describes how the leaves of Meadowsweet resemble those of the elm (Ulmus). (Source: www.conservationhandbooks.com)

 

 

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