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Benefits of a Saunaor

Benefits of a Saunaor

Benefits of a Sauna

Saunas offer many benefits to health, such as regulating blood pressure, regulating blood sugar and cholesterol, preventing infections and easing stress, data from the American Cancer Society show. Rea

d on to learn more about the many reasons to have a sauna.

Blood

In the high temperatures of a traditional or infrared sauna, skin heats up and core body temperature rises. In response to these increased heat levels, the blood vessels near the skin dilate and “cardiac output/circulation” increases. Medical research has told us that the heart rate can rise from 60-70 bpm (beats per minute) to 110-120 bpm in the sauna (140-150 bpm with more intensive bathing), and can often sink to below normal after the cooling off stage. Regular sauna usage has been shown to reduce the risk of all-cause mortality and fatal cardiac incidents along with reduced risk of stroke and hypertension.

Saunas relax muscles and soothe aches/pains in both muscles and joints. Under the high-heat provided by a sauna, the body releases endorphins which can minimize pain and is often associated with a “runner’s high.” As the body temperature rises in the heat of the sauna, blood vessels dilate allowing for increased blood circulation, which in turn speeds the body’s natural healing process. After physical activity, use the heat and steam of a sauna to promote muscle relaxation by helping to reduce muscle tension and eliminate lactic acid and other toxins that may be present. (Source: www.finnleo.com)

Sauna

German sauna medical research shows that saunas were able to significantly reduce the incidences of colds and influenza among study participants. As the body is exposed to the heat of a sauna and steam (in the case of traditional saunas), it produces white blood cells more rapidly, which in turn helps to fight illnesses and helps to kill viruses. In addition, saunas can relieve the uncomfortable symptoms of sinus congestion from colds or allergies.

A saunas' dry heat (which can get as high as 185° F) has profound effects on the body. Skin temperature soars to about 104° F within minutes. The average person will pour out a pint of sweat during a short stint in a sauna. The pulse rate jumps by 30% or more, allowing the heart to nearly double the amount of blood it pumps each minute. Most of the extra blood flow is directed to the skin; in fact, the circulation actually shunts blood away from the internal organs. Blood pressure is unpredictable, rising in some people but falling in others. (Source: www.health.harvard.edu)

 

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