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Bell plant

Bell plant

Bell plant

honey bell, (Hermannia verticillata), a rambling shrub of the mallow family (Malvaceae), native to Africa. Widely cultivated indoors, chiefly as a basket plant, it grows up to 15 cm (6 inches) tall and bears, in pairs, fragrant yellow flowers that are about 1.5 cm (0.6 inch) long and have five flat petals. The plant blooms in winter and early spring.

Bell

honey bell, (Hermannia verticillata), a rambling shrub of the mallow family (Malvaceae), native to Africa. Widely cultivated indoors, chiefly as a basket plant, it grows up to 15 cm (6 inches) tall and bears, in pairs, fragrant yellow flowers that are about 1.5 cm (0.6 inch) long and have five flat petals. The plant blooms in winter and early spring. Yellow bells (Tecoma stans) are a fast-growing evergreen shrub with slender, gray-brown branches and clusters of bright yellow, trumpet-shaped flowers. Green, toothed, lace-shaped leaves offer a beautiful backdrop for the shrub's vibrant blooms, which attract hummingbirds, butterflies, and bees.

The plant's fast growth and thin branches make them susceptible to wind damage, so try to place them in an area where they will be sheltered from high winds. Yellow bells are not often bothered by diseases or pests, though scale may affect this shrub. Small animals enjoy snacking on the seeds while larger animals, such as deer, have been known to graze the foliage.Conditions Comments: North American native varieties of this species can survive winters within their natural range but may die to the ground during especially harsh winters even there. Varieties sold in nurseries may be from tropical stock and not do so well in US cold. Yellow bells is drought tolerant and Southwestern varieties are adapted to monsoon rains with dry spells between. They may flower better if such conditions are emulated in planned landscapes, so allow ground to dry out between waterings. It is tolerant of confinement if containers are at least 12 inches in diameter and thus makes a good potted specimen. (Source: www.wildflower.org)

 

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