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Bee Balm Size OR

Bee Balm Size OR

Bee Balm Size

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The bee balm is one of the best-known plants of this family and is considered a “wonder plant” by all gardeners. This, even though it’s overlooked by botanists, who don’t consider the bee balm one of the plant family members.Enjoy watching pollinators treat themselves to your garden when you plant Sugar Buzz® ‘Rockin’ Raspberry’ Bee Balm. This native cultivar was selected for its compact mounding form, gentle spreading habit, and good resistance to powdery mildew. Great for gardens or containers, its long-lasting raspberry red flowers are a staple of summer gardens. Dark green foliage shares a lovely mint fragrance when brushed. (Monarda) Bee balm is susceptible to powdery mildew (a fungus that thrives in wet conditions), especially in late summer, when rain and humidity team together and can cause issues for the dense plants. If your plants succumb to powdery mildew after you have enjoyed the flowers for a while, it may be best to trim them back to the ground and properly dispose of the cut growth. Alternatively, if your bee balm plants come down with powdery mildew too early, and cutting the plants down is out of the question, try spraying with a solution that is three parts water to one part milk.

Bloom

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Best planted in the spring or fall, bee balm plants will produce clusters of scarlet, pink, or purple tubular flowers in mid to late summer. The distinctive "spiky hairdo" blooms are among their chief selling points, along with the plants' ability to attract a variety of wildlife to the garden landscape (among them, bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds). Plus, if you're looking for a pick that imparts long-lasting color to your garden, bee balm may just be it—the plants are ​long-blooming perennials that grow quickly and can reach up to three feet or more in height. One of the showiest summer-blooming perennials, Monarda (Bee Balm) has very distinctive, brightly colored flower-heads that create captivating border displays and provide a great impact when used in mass plantings. The blooms consist of asymmetrical, two-lipped tubular flowers borne in dense, globular terminal heads, which rest upon a whorl of decorative bracts. Exuberant, they spice up summer borders and it is difficult to resist their floral charm, despite the susceptibility of some varieties to powdery mildew.

Blooming for up to 6 weeks, usually from mid summer to early fall, these showy perennials are a striking addition to informal borders, wildflower meadows and prairies. The boldness of Monarda blooms makes it terrific for massing or as an accent plant. They combine very well with other summer perennials such as phlox, irises, daylilies and yarrows. Useful in the late summer garden, they also bridge the gap before the first asters. They also make excellent cut flowers! There are lots of different colors and forms available, so you really can't go wrong when choosing a bee balm variety. Because of the popularity of pollinator plants lately, there has been a surge of availability of even more varieties and many lesser-known bee balm species. Typically blooms fall between warm reds and cool lavenders. The blooms begin unfolding in early summer, and many varieties continue well into the fall. In order to encourage constant blooms, deadhead old blossoms. (Source: www.bhg.com)

 

 

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