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AWhen Do Purple Coneflowers Bloom

AWhen Do Purple Coneflowers Bloom

AWhen Do Purple Coneflowers Bloom

This annual spring flowering perennial is a perennial garden favorite. But few real-life gardener get to enjoy knowing when the purple coneflowers bloom, because in nature it flowers in the fall. It's easier to find at a garden center than to find out when it actually blooms for you to see. So we found out when the purple coneflowers do actually bloom and how to know when to expect them in your garden.A cottage garden favorite, growing echinacea creates an impressive display of color, especially when planted among shorter perennials where the showy, purple, pink and white flowers stand above other foliage. Plants bloom heavily from July through September and are popular with both bees and butterflies. This sturdy, eye-catching perennial stands about 3-4 feet tall.

Flower

Coneflowers grow well from seed and can be divided to make new plants. They can also be grown from stem cuttings, but often with less success. They're easily found in garden centers and can also be purchased via mail order. Coneflowers start blooming in early summer and will repeat-bloom throughout the first frost. They may take a break after their initial bloom period, but they will quickly set more flower buds.Bright, upright plants, coneflowers are a North American perennial in the Daisy family (Asteraceae). Specifically, the plant is native to the eastern United States, from Iowa and Ohio south to Louisiana and Georgia. They grow 2 to 4 feet in height with dark green foliage. They are fast growers and self-sow their seeds profusely. These midsummer bloomers can flower from midsummer through fall frost!The main blooming period for coneflowers is between June and October. Deep green foliage illuminates the growing flower stalks from below; the blossoms typically stretch higher than the surrounding leaf stalks for a brilliant show.

Depending on the cultivar, coneflowers spread their petals between 4 and 8 inches wide. Coneflowers use summer's extended sunlight period to create these large blossoms to attract beneficial insects, such as soldier beetles, so that troublesome pests, such as aphids, stay naturally controlled.Gardeners looking for the longest blooming time should deadhead some of the flowers. If you remove the flowerheads on select plants early in the summer after they fully bloom, these cut coneflowers will bloom again in the early fall in response; plants that are not deadheaded provide only summer blooms. In fact, deadheading all of your coneflowers in the early summer after blooming results in a gorgeous fall display of blooms. In a sense, you control the blooming period for these flowers; they bloom in both the summer and fall, or you choose one season for a concentrated collection of striking flowers. (Source: homeguides.sfgate.com)

 

 

 

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