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AWahoo Plant

AWahoo Plant

AWahoo Plant

Wahoo (Euonymus atropurpureus) is an excellent North American native. An alternative to the invasive burning bush (Euonymus alatus), this tough plant can be managed as a small specimen tree (30 by 30 feet) or as a thicket/hedge (9 to 12 feet) for privacy with renewal pruning. It can grow in full sun to partial shade and in wet to dry soils. This makes it an excellent candidate for rain gardens that are occasionally flooded. The late spring flowers are a deep maroon; they are small but stunning on close examination. The fall color is a delicate pink. Once the foliage drops, the red fruits inside light pink capsules will stop traffic. Seeds are a preferred bird food during winter months. USDA Zones 4–9.

Wahoo

Wahoo (Euonymus atropurpureus) is an excellent North American native. An alternative to the invasive burning bush (Euonymus alatus), this tough plant can be managed as a small specimen tree (30 by 30 feet) or as a thicket/hedge (9 to 12 feet) for privacy with renewal pruning. It can grow in full sun to partial shade and in wet to dry soils. This makes it an excellent candidate for rain gardens that are occasionally flooded. The late spring flowers are a deep maroon; they are small but stunning on close examination. The fall color is a delicate pink. Once the foliage drops, the red fruits inside light pink capsules will stop traffic. Seeds are a preferred bird food during winter months. USDA Zones 4–9.Eastern Wahoo prefers dappled sunlight to light shade, moist to mesic conditions, and a fertile loamy soil; however, it tolerates most soil types as long as they are well-drained. It can be grown in full sun to partial shade. It is particularly suited to dry shaded areas and requires shade from the midday sun. It is a moderately fast-growing but short-lived tree in the wild. In cultivation, it is often used as a hedge or screen in or naturalized and woodland settings.

Eastern Wahoo is a large, gangly, deciduous shrub or small tree in the bittersweet family that is native to central and eastern United States. It is relatively rare in North Carolina, but can be found scattered in the Piedmont and mountain areas. Its native habitat is moist, open woods, stream banks, and and thickets. The best specimens are found in deep rich humus soils, limstone soils, and stream bottoms and woods. The native Eastern Wahoo has been found in most counties of Illinois; it is occasional throughout the state (see Distribution Map). The epicenter of this woody plant's distribution is the lower Midwest. Habitats include moist to mesic woodlands, shaded to partially shaded riverbanks, woodland borders, wooded slopes, small openings in wooded areas, and thickets. This species is typically found in Maple-Basswood, Maple-Beech, and similar deciduous woodlands. It doesn't appear to spread into disturbed areas to the same extent as some invasive Euonymus spp. from Eurasia. (Source: www.illinoiswildflowers.info)

 

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