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AThermopsis Villosa

AThermopsis Villosa

AThermopsis Villosa

The tall spikes of Southern Lupine's bright yellow flowers are a beautiful sight in spring. Although native to the mountains of North Carolina and Georgia, these clump-forming plants perform beautifully in the Piedmont and coastal plain, where true Lupines don't grow well because of the heat. Cut the foliage back about a month after flowering and it may bloom again in fall.

PLANT

Description: Seeds can be sown outdoors upon collection or stored, treated and sown later. Mature plants may be divided in the fall but new divisions recover slowly. The problem is the deep roots which are broken when moved. Roots are so thick that it may take a hatchet to divide them. Thermopsis villosa is ranked S1? by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, indicating that the species is imperiled in Georgia, but that more information is needed to make a definitive ranking. Nine populations have been documented in Georgia, most in the Chattahoochee National Forest; only four populations have been confirmed since 2000. Thermopsis villosa (Carolina Lupine) is an upright, clump-forming perennial boasting dense, terminal racemes, up to 12 in. long (30 cm), of lemon-yellow, lupine-like flowers in late spring to early summer. The striking floral spikes rise above the thick foliage of bright green, trifoliate leaves. The blossoms are followed by flat oblong hairy pods. Flowers and seeds attract pollinating insects and birds. Carolina Lupine is native only to forest openings in the Appalachians, but it is adaptable to rich garden soils throughout the eastern United States. Heat and drought, Carolina Lupine is a good choice for the wildlife garden, cottage garden or prairies and meadows. It provides materials for cut-flower bouquets too! The tall spikes of Southern Lupine's bright yellow flowers are a beautiful sight in spring. Although native to the mountains of North Carolina and Georgia, these clump-forming plants perform beautifully in the Piedmont and coastal plain, where true Lupines don't grow well because of the heat. Cut the foliage back about a month after flowering and it may bloom again in fall.

Thermopsis villosa (Carolina Lupine) is an upright, clump-forming perennial boasting dense, terminal racemes, up to 12 in. long (30 cm), of lemon-yellow, lupine-like flowers in late spring to early summer. The striking floral spikes rise above the thick foliage of bright green, trifoliate leaves. The blossoms are followed by flat oblong hairy pods. Flowers and seeds attract pollinating insects and birds. Carolina Lupine is native only to forest openings in the Appalachians, but it is adaptable to rich garden soils throughout the eastern United States. Heat and drought, Carolina Lupine is a good choice for the wildlife garden, cottage garden or prairies and meadows. It provides materials for cut-flower bouquets too!.

 

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