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ATeucrium Germander

ATeucrium Germander

ATeucrium Germander

In the startup world, we often hear about the importance of setting milestones. You need to know where you’re going, you need to know when you’re getting there, you need to measure what you do so that you can improve on it, and with time you can see the fruits of your hard work. Enter Teucrium.Wall Germander is a low-growing evergreen sub-shrub and herb in the mint family that is native to Mediterranean regions. It is said that Teucrium is derived from the Greek name Teucer, who was the first king of Troy. The Latin word Chamaedrys refers to the foliage, which resembles an English oak. Along with its low growing habit, this translates to 'ground oak'.

Teucrium

Prized for its compact habit and lustrous foliage, Teucrium chamaedrys (Wall Germander) is a low-growing, woody-based evergreen perennial forming a clump of branched ascending stems densely clothed in aromatic, oval, toothed, shiny dark green leaves. Whorls of two lipped, tubular, rosy-purple flowers are produced for 3-4 weeks in midsummer, often buzzing with bees. Use as edging, low-clipped hedge along a walkway or in a formal herb garden, small-scale groundcover.Wall germander (Teucrium chamadrys) is a shrubby broadleaf evergreen with a clump-forming habit, grown mostly for its aromatic foliage (it is a member of the mint family). Sometimes categorized as Teucrium x lucidrys, wall germander is one of those old-fashioned plants that does not receive a lot of press nowadays. That fact may be changing soon, however. With many gardeners worried about bee populations being on the decline, it may be hard to ignore a proven and adaptable bee magnet such as T. chamaedrys for much longer.

Germander, an evergreen sub shrub (or suffrutex) of the Teucrium genus, which also includes, Cat Thyme, and the ground cover Fruity Teucrium, makes a great hedge. A sturdy little plant, Germander is easy to grow almost everywhere in the US. And, most of the time it looks great; but you do need to decide if you want to use it in a carefree way where the flowers are enjoyed or in a more formal way where it is pruned often to maintain a tight hedge. Like most flowering perennials, the colorless spent flowers left behind can be unsightly as the photo on the left shows.Teucrium is native to the Mediterranean area and therefore suited to Sonoma County gardens. All species are fairly drought tolerant and thrive in heat, in poor or rocky soils, and in other difficult situations. In rich garden loam, they may become lush and somewhat rangy. They take full sun to part shade, like well-drained soil, and are deer resistant. They can be left to develop a casual, natural shape or be sheared into formal topiaries or hedges. (Source: sonomamg.ucanr.edu)

 

 

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