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ASow Wild Natives

ASow Wild Natives

ASow Wild Natives

We asked gardening experts why they garden and they shared their best tips on where to find wild plants, what to plant, and how to best care for them.The best seeds are sourced as locally as possible. Beware of seed mixes that may contain non-native or invasive plants. The North American Native Plant Society (NANPS) has an extensive list of native plant nurseries that you can consult. Or, try this useful seed selector tool developed by Wildflower Farm in Orillia to choose the best native seeds for your landscape conditions. You might lose a few plants; but that’s the beauty of working with many seeds! And an established native plant garden doesn’t need new seeds. Annuals can self-seed and perennials will survive year after year. You can also harvest seeds from your mature plants to share at a local seed exchange!

Native

The most successful wildflower seedings are done in late November, December, or early January because many native wildflower species have a high percentage of dormant seeds that require a cold-moist period (stratification) before germination. This also ensures seeds will be in the soil in the spring when conditions are right for germination. Native grasses can be seeded from January to May. May is ideal for sowing warm-season grasses alone or when adding them to an existing wildflower seeding with a no-till drill. You may be one of the many individuals who have attempted to grow wildflowers by sowing a seed mix only to experience failure. Successful seeding of wildflowers depends on the right mix of native species for the area, soil preparation (which primarily involves killing existing vegetation), timing of the seeding, and weed suppression after the seeding.

From the third year on, an annual or biennial mowing or burning will keep the flowers blooming and trees and shrubs from invading.She would like to see more of us learn the simple skills required to propagate native plants — and use them to repopulate the landscape with homegrown natives. That is the mission of Wild Seed Project, one that the organization sees as increasingly urgent in the face of a fast-shifting climate, with so much diversity at risk.Colleen Dempster is a former Ontario Reptile and Amphibian Atlas Intern for Ontario Nature with a Masters of Science and a certificate in Ecosystem Restoration. Colleen has experience working at native plant nurseries and is starting her own business called ReWild Ecosystem Services, which aims to teach and assist people in working with nature instead of against it. (Source: ontarionature.org)

 

 

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