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ASolidago Ulmifolia

ASolidago Ulmifolia

ASolidago Ulmifolia

The native Elm-Leaved Goldenrod is a common plant that has been observed in nearly all counties of Illinois (see Distribution Map). Among woodland goldenrods (Solidago spp.), it is the most common species in the state. Habitats include mesic to upland woodlands, woodland edges, thinly wooded bluffs, edges of limestone glades, partially shaded banks of rivers, and thickets. This goldenrod can spread to edges of lawns in semi-shaded areas from adjacent woodlands. It is found in both higher quality and degraded habitats. Wildfires and other kinds of disturbance are beneficial if they reduce excessive shade from overhead canopy trees and competing shrubs.

Solidago

The flowers attract various kinds of bees, wasps, and flies. These insects seek nectar; bees also collect pollen. Among the bees, are such floral visitors as miner bees (Melissodes spp.), Halictid bees, masked bees (Hylaeus spp.), plasterer bees (Colletes spp.), Andrenid bees, dagger bees (Panurginae), and leaf-Cutting bees (Megachile spp.). Many insects feed destructively on Elm-Leaved Goldenrod and other goldenrods (Solidago spp.); this includes Sumitrosis inaequalis and other leaf beetles, the Goldenrod Plant Bug (Lopidea media) and other plant bugs, the Green Stink Bug (Acrosternum hilaris) and other stink bugs, the Goldenrod Lace Bug (Corythucha marmorata), Acuticauda solidaginifoliae and other aphids, various leafhoppers and treehoppers, and caterpillars of the Goldenrod Flower Moth (Schinia nundina) and many other moths (see the Moth Table). Some vertebrate animals also feed on goldenrods. For example, the Ruffed Grouse, Cottontail Rabbit, and White-Tailed Deer browse on the foliage occasionally, while such granivorous songbirds as the Eastern Goldfinch, Slate-Colored Junco, and Tree Sparrow eat the seeds during the autumn and winter.This woodland goldenrod has a terminal inflorescence that is rather lanky and spreading, while its lower leaves are lanceolate-ovate and coarsely serrated (superficially resembling the leaves of American Elm, but more narrow and thin-textured). Elm-Leaved Goldenrod is similar in appearance to Canada Goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), but the latter has lower leaves with 3 parallel veins (a central vein and two lateral veins). Canada Goldenrod also has more hairy leaves and stems, and the major branches of its panicles are usually less divergent than those of Elm-Leaved Goldenrod. Other goldenrods (Solidago spp.) can be distinguished by some combination of characteristics involving the appearance of their leaves, stems, or inflorescences. Because there are many goldenrod species in Illinois, they can be difficult to distinguish.

Solidago ulmifolia or ‘Elm-leaved Goldenrod” is a tall forb with yellow flowers bursting from a panicle located on the central stem. This plant is easily grown in well-drained soil that contains medium moisture. This woodland species loves full sun to part shade and thrives in sun dappled part shade. Plants can handle dry soil once fully established. This plant is native to a large portion of North America, stretching from Northern Canada to Southern Texas and Florida.Most reported sites for Solidago ulmifolia in Wisconsin are in the southern three or four tiers of counties. In Brown County it appears to be strongly associated with areas where the soil is relatively shallow over limestone. It does very well on such sites, but is essentially absent elsewhere in the county. (Source: www.uwgb.edu)

 

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