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AShelter Tubes

AShelter Tubes

AShelter Tubes

Fast facts on the world's most popular shelter tube survival shelter: 69% of Americans have already seen a demonstration of a shelter tube, in the form of a selfie tube.You may have seen them before, especially if you have had termites, they are little paths of what looks like dirt. These little tunnels are called Termite Shelter Tubes, and they are created by Subterranean Termites. Because these termites need a moist environment, they build tunnel tubes to protect them from weather and predators as they forage for food. These tubes are made out of saliva, mud, wood, drywall and feces.

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Wood that is in contact with the earth is vulnerable to subterranean termite infestation. The termites create mud tubes through timber and use them to reach their food sources. However, these termites can also create shelter tubes between cracks on concrete walls and foundations. Whichever the case, the presence of termite shelter tubes is a concerning sight.Mud tubes are physical evidence of a termite infestation in your home. The infestation may have existed for months before the termites created the tubes. If you find mud tubes, call SafeHaven Pest Control for termite control and inspection services. When the termites reach the inside of the house they may build tubes and strange structures out of the same material inside to find more wood.

They travel inside these tubes and inside the wood. You might not even see any damage because they travel and chew inside the wood. This is typically the only part you will see outside the wood, IF you even see this. This often indicates they are near exhausting the wood inside and are reaching for more, so this could indicate a lot of termite damage. Do you see any damage? The wood is damaged inside just under the surface.These tubes typically measure between 1/4 and 1 inch in diameter. While they're constructed of the same materials, working tubes are made to last longer than exploratory tubes. Utility mud tubes allow termites to travel long distances along basement walls and home foundations. They may also be found around sills, sub floors, joists, window frames, and under porches. (Source: www.orkin.com)

 

 

 

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