FutureStarr

AReed Seed

AReed Seed

AReed Seed

Fully-grown reeds produce toads, swamp tar, and green salamanders when harvested. 3-5 toad egg sacs (depending on the composting used), with a chance of receiving 10 swamp tar and/or green salamanders per toad egg sac harvested, are gained per crop. Five toad egg sacs are received if supercompost is used, and greater numbers of sacs can be received if the patch ticks between the start and end of harvest. Harvesting yields 190 farming experience per sac. Reeds harvested on Entrana will only yield swamp tar and toad egg sacs.

Reed

Fully-grown reeds produce toads, swamp tar, and swamp lizards when harvested. 3-5 toad egg sacs (depending on the composting used), with a chance of receiving 10 swamp tar and/or swamp lizards per toad egg sac harvested, are gained per crop. Five toad egg sacs are received if supercompost is used, and greater numbers of sacs can be received if the patch ticks between the start and end of harvest. Harvesting yields 190 farming experience per sac. Reeds harvested on Entrana will only yield swamp tar and toad egg sacs.Common Reed is a very tall (1 – 3+ metre high) stout perennial grass, often forming extensive beds with its vigorous creeping rootstock. It has wide flat greyish green leaves which turn brown and are shed in winter leaving hard hollow persistent cane like stems: ‘reeds’ which are harvested from managed reedbeds for thatching roofs. Its large feathery flowers are produced later than most grasses (August – October) and can be an impressive sight en masse swaying in the breeze.

Reed dominance can be reduced by cutting, where fertility is not too high. A summer cut and removal of ‘Marsh hay' in July can make space forother plant species to grow. Any summer cutting needs to take account of potential disturbance to nesting birds. Cutting back new reed shoots (‘colts') below water level in spring will have the effect of drowning and restricting new growth (eg to maintain areas of open water).When we hear terms like Reeds and Rushes we tend to think of seeds that thrive in areas that have a lot of water like rivers, wetlands, or swamps. This is very true, and most of these native grass seeds for sale will thrive in a wet place with hydric soils. The Juncus family which includes Path Rush is an exception to this general rule of thumb, because we have grown it successfully year after year in a mesic/dry soil in our production fields (Source: www.everwilde.com)

 

Related Articles