FutureStarr

ARabbit Tobacco for Sale

ARabbit Tobacco for Sale

ARabbit Tobacco for Sale

Rabbit tobacco, known as Kawa, has a several uses. Some of the most popular include smoking, snuffing (chewing tobacco), dipping snuff, making snus and in religious ceremonies.Make sure this fits by entering your model number. * FREE SHIPPING on any additional products from our store !!! NAME(S): Sweet Everlasting / Sweet Cudweed / Old-Field Balsam / Life-Everlasting / Rabbit Tobacco / Indian Posy / Cat's Foot // SCIENTIFIC NAME: Gnaphalium Obtusifolium syn. Pseudognaphalium Obtusifolium HARDINESS ZONE: Annual / Biennial // BLOOM TIME: July - Sept PLANT HEIGHT: 20 - 32" // PLANT SPACING: 12 - 18" LIGHT: Sun // WATER: Average // COLOR: White with Yellow Centers

Rabbit

On this particular day we encountered Rabbit Tobacco, or Gnaphalium obtusifolium. Now the common name stirred a distant memory but when Gill related that this species was of the Composite family I thought, “Nah, can't be the rabbit tobacco I remember”. Composites include such well-known beauties as asters, daisies, and sunflowers. Rabbit Tobacco is an attractive wildflower when blooming but I could see little resemblance to a daisy.Seeing the dried reminders of those days on the Greenway prompted me to do a little more study of the little more study of the plant and I was surprised at what I learned. I first consulted Wilford Corbin, a local historian/naturalist and friend in the Nantahala Hiking Club. He too had tried rabbit tobacco as a lad but stated that he and his friends rolled the tobacco in paper torn from brown paper bags. Wilford did not recall rabbit tobacco being a poor man's alternative to real cigarettes but was simply something country kids did. Wilford humorously speculated that Rabbit Tobacco may have possibilities as a cash crop since using it would perhaps prevent the thousands of deaths associated with the use of real tobacco.

When I did a GOOGLE internet search of rabbit tobacco I found the plant has quite a history. Native Americans believed the plant had spiritual powers. Cherokee and Lumbee Indians of North Carolina burned the leaves in sweat baths as it caused profuse sweating. Other tribes rubbed chewed leaves on their bodies to strengthen them or for protection in battle. Others believed the smoke of rabbit tobacco had restorative powers or would prevent bad luck. A little-known plant with a rich magical history, rabbit tobacco has a ton of possibilities for magic workers today. The Sioux described it as a plant able to walk the borderline between the dead and the living, which is shown in the way the plant's flowers persist after the plant is dead but also in that the dried herb will suddenly, after months or years, release a lot of scent--as if it has just returned from the world of the dead. Various uses amongst the tribes illustrate this magic herb's borderland capabilities (living/dead, awake/asleep, sane/insane). The Alabama tribe used it to wash someone who suffered from nervousness and insomnia caused by pestiferous spirits of the dead, (Source:www.alchemy-works.com)

 

 

 

Related Articles