FutureStarr

A Young;;

A Young;;

Young Miami

We know what the potential of Miami is. But it can be tough for young people to see ourselves thriving in our County. Miami-Dade is facing an affordable housing crisis, and we have to choose between housing costs absorbing a huge chunk of our money or staying at our parents’ homes (don’t even mention buying a house). Unlike older generations, we have no choice but to face the threat climate change places on the future of our community as our city sinks. It can be impossible to move around this County if you don’t have a car and incredibly frustrating if you do, and unfortunately we allocate our budget as if prisons and police are the answer to creating safer communities. Worst of all, our local leadership is not taking the steps necessary to seriously tackle these problems and create the bold solutions we need. Instead, they’re stuck on politics as usual and captured by the influence of special interests. But enough of that. We’ve got issues, and we’ve got solutions, and that’s why we put together the Young Peoples’ Policy Priorities. It’s our platform to create the future we deserve. And we’ll be using it to make sure the next County Commission in 2020, and every year after and every city within, represents young people and the future of Miami-Dade. Josh Young has helped lead service-learning, civic engagement and community-campus partnerships with Miami Dade College since 1994. He has a bachelor’s degree in Sociology from the University of Virginia and master’s degrees in Social Work and Public Administration from Florida State University. He served two tours with the Peace Corps in Mali, West Africa and Paraguay, South America, and he ran summer community service programs for youth for four summers in the Dominican Republic with Visions International. Josh has been a national service-learning mentor with the American Association of Community Colleges and has extensive experience leading workshops for faculty, students, community partners, and administrators around the nation. The Frost Young Artist International Piano Competition at the Frost School of Music is a celebration of young artists. The competition aims to give an opportunity for the participants to enrich their piano studies, perform on professional stages, and serve the community through outreach concerts. Our goal is to encourage young musicians to put their gifts to the service of others so that through the music they may contribute to bringing people together and promote the goodness and beauty that is found in true art.

Yung Miami has not had an easy life. She grew up in a rough neighborhood and she’s had a lot of heartbreak to endure. It was really difficult when her partner JT was sentenced to prison, and the two had to put their career goals on hold, but this wasn’t the worst of it. Her mother, Keenya Young, was convicted of a crime in 2009. The charges were serious as Young was shoplifting and then drove away in a car that ended up crashing into another car, causing the 40 year old in the other vehicle’s death. The Young Leadership Division encourages support of the Annual Federation/UJA Campaign. Starting with our Chai Society at just $18 a month and our Tri-Chai society at $54 a month, it’s never been easier to be a philanthropist! Those who make a donation of $1,000 or more a year become members of the Ben-Gurion Society, a national donor recognition program created by The Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA). Started in 1999, the Young Painters Competition features artists aged 25 - 35, who demonstrate excellence. The juror, chosen from nationally recognized painters, museum directors, curators and art professionals, selects 10 finalists. Each year's winner is awarded the $10,000 William and Dorothy Yeck Award and the painting becomes a part of the permanent collection at Miami University. Alternating between representational/realism and non-representational painting, this competition assures a prominent national role for Miami University, rewarding and inspiring the creativity of talented young artists. We hope you enjoy our yearly competition as we navigate the visual, historical and critical development of painting through the 21st century. (Source: miamioh.edu)

MIAMI

Yung Miami promoted it through social media and by paying DJs to play it in clubs. Soon the track, which features a prominent sample of fellow Florida rapper Khia's "My Neck, My Back (Lick It)", racked up hundreds of thousands of plays. On October 29, 2021, Yung Miami released her debut solo single, "Rap Freaks", alongside its music video. A sex-positive track , it sees her reference various rappers, including Megan Thee Stallion, Diddy, and Meek Mill. Miami explained that "the song is showing love to all the rappers right now, it's nothing personal. I [named] a bunch of the guys who are on top, that's hot, that's poppin'. Nothing is personal, nothing is literal, I’m just having fun". During the interview, she was questioned by radio host Charlamagne tha God in regard to her controversial tweet that claimed what she would do if she found out that her son was gay. Yung Miami replied that her previous tweet had nothing to do with the LGBTQ community and was specifically about her son. She said, "I was just talking about my son. I just said that if I saw anything gay in my son, that I would beat him". While he wasn’t named in “RAP FREAKS,” Miami took a moment to gush over rapper Jeezy during her interview with Billboard. Growing up, Miami says her stepfather would bump Jeezy’s songs while driving her to and from school, leading to Jeezy becoming one of her favorite rappers of all time. Miami isn’t asking for a song with Jeezy, but she does have another request. “I would love for him to perform at one of my birthday bashes,” she says. “If you’re reading this interview, that would be a good surprise for me.” And as if the new track isn’t buzzworthy enough, Miami has more in store via her upcoming website, CareshaPlease.com. The website is named after her legal first name, something fans insisted on calling Miami, much to her dismay. “They just don’t respect me. They like calling me Caresha, they say it feels better and that they feel like they know me,” she says. “If I’m out with my family and hear someone call me Yung Miami, I know it’s a fan. When you’ve got the whole world calling you Caresha it’s kind of weird because it’s hard to separate the two.”We know what the potential of Miami is. But it can be tough for young people to see ourselves thriving in our County. Miami-Dade is facing an affordable housing crisis, and we have to choose between housing costs absorbing a huge chunk of our money or staying at our parents’ homes (don’t even mention buying a house). Unlike older generations, we have no choice but to face the threat climate change places on the future of our community as our city sinks. It can be impossible to move around this County if you don’t have a car and incredibly frustrating if you do, and unfortunately we allocate our budget as if prisons and police are the answer to creating safer communities.Josh Young has helped lead service-learning, civic engagement and community-campus partnerships with Miami Dade College since 1994. He has a bachelor’s degree in Sociology from the University of Virginia and master’s degrees in Social Work and Public Administration from Florida State University. He served two tours with the Peace Corps in Mali, West Africa and Paraguay, South America, and he ran summer community service programs for youth for four summers in the Dominican Republic with Visions International. Josh has been a national service-learning mentor with the American Association of Community Colleges and has extensive experience leading workshops for faculty, students, community partners, and administrators around the nation. Josh is an aspiring U.S. diplomat who is always seeking a challenge. He attended Miami Dade College Kendall Campus before transferring to Columbia University, where he recently graduated with a B.A. in Political Science. He was a Congressional Hispanic Leadership Institute (CHLI) Global Leader Fellow where he advanced Hispanic representation and contributed to U.S. policymaking on Capitol Hill and at a Government Relations office. He has also studied abroad in Indonesia & Iceland and interned at Mumbai Mobile Creches in India.

Elizabeth Juarez is a Chicago native who is passionate about civic engagement and advocating for foster care youth. She holds a Bachelor's Degree from DePaul University, where she focused on International studies and specialized in Latin American studies. While completing her degree, she traveled to Cuba to research the Arab influence within the Cuban diaspora. Shortly after completing her degree Elizabeth joined AmeriCorps, dedicating time to supporting survivors of human trafficking and domestic violence.This experience led her to pursue an AS in Paralegal Studies at MDCto gain a greater understanding of the law to influence political change. As a student at MDC, she was awarded the Civic Leadership Award because of her continued efforts to positively impact the Miami community. In Elizabeth's free time, she serves as a panel member helping youth within the foster care system. Kiki Mutis was born in Colombia and has lived in Miami since 1981. She is an MDC alumna, and later earned an MS in Environmental Science from FIU. Kiki served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Bolivia where she focused on soil and natural resource conservation and youth development. She has been an active board member of The Colombia Project Global, a micro-loan organization, and traveled to Colombia to meet program administrators and visit micro-loan recipients to understand their concerns better. Kiki worked for Citizens for a Better South Florida where she helped organize urban forestry projects and hands-on afterschool science programs. She also worked at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden as the Community Outreach Coordinator, and with Pelican Harbor Seabird Station where she was the Operations and Volunteer Manager. She also has led professional development workshops for the Earth Ethics Institute at MDC for many years. Maria Villalobos was born and raised in Maracaibo, Venezuela and moved to Florida at the age of 10. She received her Bachelor degree in Psychology from FSU and her Master of Science in College Student Personnel Administration from Illinois State University. While at FSU, she found her passion for social justice and service and became heavily involved with the Center for Leadership and Social Change, the SGA and the Hispanic/Latino Student Union. Maria is extremely passionate about education equity and ensuring that all students receive a high-quality education. Prior to MDC, she was a Teach For America AmeriCorps member in Miami-Dade, an elementary school teacher in Redwood City, California, and the Character and Leadership Development Coordinator for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Florida. She has also worked at the university level at both Illinois State University and FIU, and is happiest when she gets to interact with students and engage in conversations around diversity, equity and inclusion. Maria is excited to be part of the MDC iCED family and continue to support students to become changemakers in their communities and beyond.Yung Miami has not had an easy life. She grew up in a rough neighborhood and she’s had a lot of heartbreak to endure. It was really difficult when her partner JT was sentenced to prison, and the two had to put their career goals on hold, but this wasn’t the worst of it. Her mother, Keenya Young, was convicted of a crime in 2009. The charges were serious as Young was shoplifting and then drove away in a car that ended up crashing into another car, causing the 40 year old in the other vehicle’s death. We were interested in knowing how well the music industry has been treating Yung Miami. We did a bit of research and were happy to learn that she is on her way to making a fortune. Although she hasn’t yet joined the millionaire’s club, she’s half of the way there. Her estimated net worth as of January of 2019, is at $500,000. This is just the beginning for her. When her partner JT is released from prison the two will still have an amazing career to look forward to and that time is soon approaching. Prior to starting Alma Kitchen in May 2020, Alexandra Griffin was Chief of Staff at Chew, and worked in Brand Management at MillerCoors in Chicago. Alexandra joined MillerCoors in November after spending a year in London where she worked for a non-profit in the youth sector focusing on government relations and communications. Prior to moving to the UK, Alexandra worked in Global Brand Strategy at Hasbro where she launched Hasbro’s Disney Princess and Frozen business. Alexandra has also worked in research and innovation for Dunkin’ Brands where she launched the brand into eight international markets. Alexandra holds a BS in Business Marketing from Miami University, where she founded a business organization, Miami University Women in Business.Started in 1999, the Young Painters Competition features artists aged 25 - 35, who demonstrate excellence. The juror, chosen from nationally recognized painters, museum directors, curators and art professionals, selects 10 finalists. Each year's winner is awarded the $10,000 William and Dorothy Yeck Award and the painting becomes a part of the permanent collection at Miami University. Alternating between representational/realism and non-representational painting, this competition assures a prominent national role for Miami University, rewarding and inspiring the creativity of talented young artists. We hope you enjoy our yearly competition as we navigate the visual, historical and critical development of painting through the 21st century. (Source: miamioh.edu)

 

 

Related Articles